Author Topic: My first W116 here at last  (Read 108612 times)

ptashek

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #255 on: 17 November 2017, 12:45 PM »
Mine were always black. Whether that was a factory state, or the result of some years old underseal attempt I can't say. It looked stock though when off the car.

I personally prefer them black, but that raw look isn't bad either.
1993 "Pearl Blue" W124 280TE
1988 "Arctic White" W124 200T
1979 "Icon Gold" W116 450SE (history, resto)

gavin116

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #256 on: 03 September 2018, 02:42 PM »
Liberté éclairant le monde

Seems strange that at one stage I used to do updates almost every other month, now it seems like it is annually.

Answering some questions posted last year about my sway arms: the aluminium colour was used as replacement arms come in that colour from M-B. The sway arms on our cars were overpainted in black on the production-line because from certain angles one can see them. I quite like the natural colour.

The replacement rear window demister relay and switch seems to have done the trick. I had occasion to use it when we made our early morning trip from Folkstone to the Channel Tunnel. You’ll see from the pictures that I don’t have compound rear glass it is merely a single pane with several horizontal gold coloured wires. The switch now lights up when depressed, and a quick flick to the left cancels operation if needed.

A new flasher relay was also installed primarily to increase the signal noise, but alas I still can’t hear the indicators (like a fair amount of you on the forum, I’m middle aged and rapidly getting absent minded, can’t read without my glasses, hearing is a little dodgy, etc). I’m not sure how to remedy this, but it’s looking more and more like I need to bite the bullet and install a modern three pin (31, 49 and 49a) relay. I could use some piggy-back wires to attach the new relay with spade terminals to the original round terminals that are in the car.

Perhaps someone can shed some light, I know Koan did a new to old relay transplant, I wonder if the new relays with flat terminals have a louder chime when the indicators are engaged?

I entered Mrs W in the annual M-B concours competition in Milton Keynes. I had to enter her in the the Master Class as I had won first place two years ago in the concours d’Elegance Class (2016). This put me in a totally different league… I realise that I will never really achieve a place, as there are a lot of failures on my car, but despite this, I was surprised and very impressed with my score. It must be remembered that I actually do use the vehicle, whilst not in winter because of salt on the road, she does still come out rain or shine in the summer.

The lowest score of the day was 60/300 for a S600 coupé in the Enthusiast’s Class, and the highest was 286/300 in the Master Class for a R107 420SL.
My results was 245/300, which left me in third place for sedan vehicles. Master class is divided into sedans (13a), cabriolets (13b) and coupés (13c) there being no age category per se, but the vehicle must be at least 2 years old and have over 10 000 miles. We were only 3 sedans in my subcategory: a pristine W202 which won first place with 281/300, and a W126 with 261/300.

I know I lost points because I couldn’t operate my radio, I couldn’t find the radio code and so couldn’t demonstrate that the electric aerial worked (more about that later). And obvious no points went to my W129 rims. My engine bay is also very tatty by concours standards. It is also very difficult to get the inner fenders squeaky clean compared to the newer cars with plastic fender liners…

So, next year will be a gap year (off to Europe for the weekend) but I will compete in 2020. Not sure if I want to compete in the concours Master Class, as I know it will be very difficult to eke out the lost points, that said I am aiming to refurbish my bundts, and get Michelin gold plated, platinum belted, diamond encrusted rubber on them (XWX’s), and I have now installed a period correct Becker 663 (washing machine knob) radio. I will have to apply more elbow grease to those wheel arches…

A part of me just wants to compete in the Exhibitors Class, as I know I can never get a place in the class I have to compete in. But then, I figure, what the heck, for the sake of showing other members of the M-B club UK and the public, that there is more to classic Mercedes-Benz vehicles than two door cabriolets. Mrs W did attract a fair amount of attention, being the only W116 entered in concours, although there were 3 6.9s on public display. So, I guess I will be there with my Meguiar’s and kitchen paper in 2020.

I finally bit the bullet, and decided to get a period correct radio for the car. As my vehicle is a 1979 model, the correct Becker isn’t the older pin-stripe Becker, but rather the “washing-machine” knob Becker. Only problem: this radio certainly don’t deliver today’s hi-fidelity. To that end, I spent a not insubstantial amount to have the radio converted by Tadpole radios. I’m in two minds about the conversion: I finally got the bluetooth to work, which is what I know we will usually use. In France I could get the FM frequency to work, but battled to get even white noise to ensue from the radio on the UK shores.

I need to contact Tadpole Radios to find out what I’m doing wrong or if there is a problem with my conversion. They do promise to keep your radio’s original functionality, but to that end, no more cassette player as the new radio innards occupy too much space… Also, the little green U LED doesn’t light up to say you’re on the FM frequency, and the side yellow LEDs don’t light to indicate you’re on AM,LW or SW (of course, now just FM and AM).

Still, the radio looks absolutely wonderful in place, like it was designed by M-B to be at one with the car (a bit like a Becker pinstripe in a W108 where the radio knobs match the auxiliary knobs perfectly). Pity I forgot to take a photo of it in-situ, but do see the attached photo of the radio itself. I also found that the universal ISO radio power connector has a loose connection, occasionally power is interrupted, which never occurred with the previous Audio10. Perhaps Tadpole’s connector is of inferior quality?

What can I say about the actual trip. Well, it was fabulous from start to finish! We picked up the car on Thursday evening, and winded our way from Guildford to Folkstone where we overnighted. On Friday morning early we made our way to the Eurostar, this time the electric windows behaving themselves. (Well, I did have a problem with the new driver’s side regulator on way to concours earlier in the year. It failed in the open position, no sure why, but I removed the driver’s door panel, (unfortunately breaking an older brittle clip up near the window opening  >:(  ), pushed on the glass, and it freed up nicely. Pity M-B did’t include a micro switch to cut the power at the top and bottom of the run, I think this would save our poorly constructed window regulators from over closing, subsequently warping and ultimately self-destructing.)

During our crossing I removed the old Audio10 and my iTranzit, and replaced it with my Becker 663 which is bluetooth enabled. As stated before, annoyingly the ISO power connector block (the terracotta one) seems to have a dodgy connection, as the radio will sometimes power down. I might try to tape the connectors together with self fusing tape or perhaps loop a cable tine around them?

The car performed flawlessly, averaging 130 km/h with the aircon running at ¼, any more than that and it gets way to Arctic! We stopped timeously to get some more fuel, once bitten, twice shy, I did not want to rely on the reserve light which failed to deploy last year, leaving us stranded at the side of the road in Thionville.

After stopping for a wonderful simple French lunch we found our way to Alsace. Our destination was a small village just outside Colmar. To my surprise, we encountered a Statue-of-Liberty! One of several around the world, and what a sight. (This replica of the Statue of Liberty is made from resin and stands 12 meters high. It was sculpted to commemorate the 100th death anniversary of the sculptor Auguste Batholdi, who was born in Colmar and created the "Liberty lightening the world” or “Liberté éclairant le monde”.)

Saturday and Sunday we spent, well, imbibing. I still cannot say that I get Gewurtztraminer but was quite partial to Cremant d’Alsace, but I did enjoy the Alsatian hospitality, food and surrounds, a curious mix of French and German. We savoured the local dish: Choucroute Garnie à l'Alsacienne a casserole of pork and fermented cabbage (sauerkraut) and not forgetting Kougelhopf or bundt-cake, where the nickname for our alloys was derived from. It was a feast for the senses. Sadly, on Monday it was time to return back home in a light drizzle.

Mileage wise, I passed yet another palindrome. Temperature wise at lower speeds: 90 - 110 km/h or 55 - 70 mph, the heat gauge runs a whisker past the ½ way mark, 80 ºC or 175 ºF, but increase that speed to  130 km/h or 80 mph, and the heat gauge rises to just under ¾ about 100 ºC or 212.5 ºF!  I think however that the new viscous fan clutch is doing it’s job well, as the temperature never climbed higher that ¾ either at high speed or bumper-to-bumper crawling traffic.

Fuel consumption figures revealed:
293 miles (471.5 km) - 72.12 lt = 15.3 l/100 km or 6.5 km/lt (18.5 mpg) mainly averaging 130km/h
250 miles (402 km) - 58.63 lt = 14.6 l/100 km or 6.9 km/l (19.4 mpg) mainly averaging 90 - 110 km/h
211 miles (340 km) - 43.92 lt = 12.9 l/100 km or 7.7 km/l  (21.8 mpg) mainly averaging 110 - 120 km/h

TOTAL
754 miles (1213.5 km) - 174.67 lt = 14.4 l/100 km or 7.0 km/l (19.6 mpg)

Keep 116ing
 :D   
« Last Edit: 03 September 2018, 11:22 PM by gavin116 »

ptashek

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #257 on: 04 September 2018, 05:15 AM »
Well done on the concourse Gavin. It ain't my cup of tea, but I certainly can appreciate the effort required to prep for an event like this. Definitely a good call on showing those R107 guys who's boss ;)
It's great you continue to use the car regardless :)

Quote
Seems strange that at one stage I used to do updates almost every other month, now it seems like it is annually.

I can totally relate to it, and I've called it the curse of a restored car. My Goldie hasn't required anything in the last two-and-a-bit years, other than scheduled maintenance. Jump in, turn the key, drive 5000km, rinse, repeat. It's fascinating to drive, and "modern car" reliable to the point of being almost boring.

I've mostly switched my attention to the S124 now, as it - sadly - turned out to be a problem child in disguise. Doing a 2500km round-trip to Charente-Maritime in France with a failed idle throttle body was neither fascinating, nor boring :D
1993 "Pearl Blue" W124 280TE
1988 "Arctic White" W124 200T
1979 "Icon Gold" W116 450SE (history, resto)

Squiggle Dog

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #258 on: 04 September 2018, 08:36 AM »
When I see someone not post in a while, it makes me fear another W116 enthusiast has sold their car and moved on. I think I went through a period of a couple years where I was simply too busy to do any work on my own car, and fortunately it didn't need it mechanically. I have a long way to go before my car looks like yours.

It seems you got decent points for your car, and the changes you are planning to make will no doubt increase your score. It's really nice seeing someone put so much work into a W116 since most people only seem to bother with the coupes and cabriolets.

Great picture of the Universal. That's my dream car, and while I do own one, it's so rusty that I don't know if it will ever see the road.
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Type17

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #259 on: 04 September 2018, 12:07 PM »
When I see someone not post in a while, it makes me fear another W116 enthusiast has sold their car and moved on.


I was just thinking about this the other day - for the record, I'm still here  :) , but my car is now stored about 35km/22 miles from my house (previously, it was 3km/2 miles), so I'm not driving it as much (only 2-3 times per year).
Ironically, that's keeping the mileage low, and the maintenance requirements low (although I'm aware that some maintenance is based on time, rather than mileage).
In a few years, we hope to be able to move to a house where I can keep the car at home, so it will see a bit more use then.


Thread hijack over...

Wessel Badenhorst

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #260 on: 05 September 2018, 02:58 AM »
Congrats Gavin! Enjoy every moment
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gavin116

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #261 on: 29 February 2020, 02:26 PM »
Better late than never…
…a visit to the Loire Valley (13th - 17th of June 2019)


I realised when I posted a flex disc picture recently and people commented how clean the underside of my car was, that I had forgotten to write up last year’s road trip. Well, the underside no longer looks quite so fresh as I do use the car in all weather and do at least one long journey each year but the suspension sure is tight! And so as they say, “better late than never!” (13th - 17th of June 2019)

Like all our Continental visits, they begin in a frenetic rush after work, crossing London in peak hour traffic en-route to Guilford. From there, we decamp, swapping cars, and wind our way through miles of country lanes to get on the M25, and then on the UK’s biggest lorry park, the A2.

When we finally reached the Premier Inn in Folkestone to spend the night, we encountered a really good omen: our room number was 116! We had our dinner and wine and retired for the night. Early the next morning, we headed off to the Eurostar car train terminal. It was obvious something was up, and little did we know, it was the 24hr Le Mans which was being held very near to where we would be staying in Saumur! So the road trip was punctuated with all number of Baden-Württemberg supercars: Porches to you and me, and quite a lot of classics too.

We decided on lunch in Hornfleur as it was on the way to our destination of Saumur, and it neighbours Le Havre where an aunt lives. So we pre-arranged a luncheon date to catch-up, and take in some sights. The approach to Hornfleur is quite something, as one has to cross the Seine on a rather elaborate suspension bridge: The Pont de Normandy. It has a very steep entry and exit. “The Pont de Normandie is a cable-stayed road bridge that spans the river Seine linking Le Havre to Honfleur in Normandy, northern France. Its total length is 2,143.21 metres – 856 metres between the two piers.” Click on this video link to see some amazing footage of this bridge that someone else posted on YouTube.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J57Klshns5Q

“Honfleur is a city in the department of Calvados, in northern France's Normandy region. Ports don't come any prettier than Honfleur on the Seine's estuary.”

Once we repatriated aunt Jill back in Le Harve, we made our way to Saumur in the heart of the Loire Valley. It was a nail biting experience as I wasn’t paying due attention and suddenly looking at Mrs White’s fuel gauge, I realised that we could well become stranded. You will remember that I have form for this… Progressing at a much slower speed; driving on petrol fumes, we managed to eventually find a fuel station that was too far away for comfort.

From then on things were a breeze, and we found our lovely hotel in the heart of Saumur: Chateau de Verrieres. This very beautiful former home of French aristocracy was built in 1896. It is set on a 2 hectare park, has the most wonderful original reception rooms, entrance halls and staircases and 10 bedrooms that are ‘period correct’. Saumur itself has a beautiful medieval castle (Château de Saumur) situated on a hillock in the centre of town. It was originally constructed in the 10th century, as a fortified stronghold against Norman attacks. It was destroyed, later rebuilt by Henry II, and developed further since.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Château_de_Saumur

Whilst in Saumur, we did a little wine tasting to learn some more about the wines of the Loire. We were taken to a very interesting courtyard: Clos D’Entre les Murs, where the vines are grown on one side of the wall to keep the roots cool, and the vine itself is passed through a hole in the wall to spread and grown in the sunlight. Apparently this is the only vineyard of its type in the World.

Our host for the day Vanessa finished our wine visit by striking open a bottle of sparkling local wine (apparently the Champagne AOC no longer allow even the use of the words “méthode champenoise”) using a sharp knife. This method is called sabrage. First, the cage is removed from the bottle neck, exposing the cork. The bottle is then held in the non-dominant hand with the seam of the bottle facing up. The knife in your dominant hand is then run with some speed from the body up the neck which strikes the ridged area near the top the bottle, sending the bottle lip and cork flying in the air.

Our next day began with a visit to the mushroom caves of Saumur, where they have a mushroom museum, and a growing area.  The Musée du Champignon has some 250 species of mushroom on display. It was certainly the oddest museum I think I have ever visited, but very interesting nonetheless.
https://www.musee-du-champignon.com/en/

We then made our way to the nearby town of Ambrose to visit Clos Lucé. This wonderful site was where Leonardo da Vinci spent the final years of his life. The grounds of the ‘vineyard’ are filled with many working models of his inventions as well as some of his more fanciful sketch ideas.

Despite being in the thick of the 24 hour Le Mans, we didn’t actually attend the race  or any of the other fringe events. There was a very big Porsche Club presence, and a whole gambit of classic cars. It has made me think that this could be a possible future France trip. I understand that the event is very well attended, and one needs to have made some prior reservations.
https://www.lemans.org/en/24-hours-of-le-mans

And sadly, it was over too soon, and we found ourselves on the motorway heading back to Calais with several hundreds of other Brits. It was so busy in fact that we could not stop at fuel stations as they were ‘full’! And when we did finally pull in to a service area to stop for a toilet break, I got a huge shock. When we returned to the car, it was my turn to drive, and when I turned the key to start the car, it was dead! Several attempts at starting, and there was only the subtle whirring of the fuel pump.

It took a few moments for me to work out that my partner had removed the key from the ignition without putting the car in park. Slipping the gear lever from D to P, and she fired up on the button. On the bright side at least I know the starter inhibitor switch is working. Soon we were on route again, the rest of the journey uneventful. We seemed to use an average of almost a full tank of fuel per 320 miles. I think my reserve light doesn’t work, so I tend to rely more on mileage… Could probably have pushed to 360 miles.

I must say that I am getting slightly more used to using the new radio, just the carcase is original, the insides are all new by a company called Tadpole. The functions are operated by turning the volume, balance and tuning knobs to the left or right in a quick motions either once, twice or three times. I still need to refer to the manual at times. Streaming music is simple, and the sound quality is outstanding.

My next big Mrs White job has to be changing the timing chain, guide rails, oiler tubes  and tensioner. I’ve been quoted half a liver and a kidney, so I might have to think about doing it myself. I suspect this cannot be done on the roadside which is my only option at this stage. It’s a real worry for me. I may also enter concours this year, as I seem to do so every two years.

Keep 116ing,
:)
« Last Edit: 29 February 2020, 02:47 PM by gavin116 »

gavin116

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #262 on: 29 February 2020, 02:27 PM »
More photos

ptashek

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #263 on: 01 March 2020, 10:07 AM »
Yours is a very weird instrument cluster Gavin. The center part, normally blanked off except on cars with steering column gear stick, specifically.

I can't say I have seen a W116 instrument cluster before with washer and coolant level indicators, or a failed bulb light. An iPod lamp?

There must be a story behind this :)
1993 "Pearl Blue" W124 280TE
1988 "Arctic White" W124 200T
1979 "Icon Gold" W116 450SE (history, resto)

UTn_boy

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #264 on: 05 March 2020, 12:52 AM »
Yours is a very weird instrument cluster Gavin. The center part, normally blanked off except on cars with steering column gear stick, specifically.

I can't say I have seen a W116 instrument cluster before with washer and coolant level indicators, or a failed bulb light. An iPod lamp?

There must be a story behind this :)

If I am remembering correctly, I believe he robbed these warning lights out of a late R107 and adapted them to his W116.  This works beautifully since they're essentially the same housing. 
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orientrot

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #265 on: 05 March 2020, 10:46 AM »

If I am remembering correctly, I believe he robbed these warning lights out of a late R107 and adapted them to his W116.  This works beautifully since they're essentially the same housing.

Pretty sure you are correct here. The VDO parts numbers on the instrument cluster case between the 116 and 107 are identical. I've been looking at that over the past few days because I want to switch to an electronic speedometer to use with the transmission controller for my OM606/722.6 swap and the later 107s had electronic speedometers.
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UTn_boy

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #266 on: 05 March 2020, 04:33 PM »
I'd want to get rid of one of the high beam indicators, as two are redundant.  But which one?  Maybe make the high beam indicator in the middle of the cluster come on with the front fog lamps or rear fog lamp, and make it a different color.....such as green.  Green is what Mercedes used for a rear fog lamp tell tale light on the early W116 cars.  Orange on later ones.  Then again, since that tell tale light is still present in the headlight switch knob for the rear fog lamp we're back at square one.  I guess a tell tale light for the front fog lamps would be ideal since there was never an tell tale light for the front ones. 
1966 250se coupe`, black/dark green leather
1970 600 midnight blue/parchment leather
1971 300sel 6.3, papyrus white/dark red leather
1971 280sel Black/black leather
1973 300sel 4.5, silver blue metallic/blue leather
1976 280s astral silver/blue MB Tex

paraguaiano

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #267 on: 04 April 2020, 12:33 PM »
hello and 'good evening everyone my name is peter and I am writing to you from Italy.
I wanted to ask you if you could help me on many things where I have many doubts about my maecedes w 116 280 if, one is! I would also like to add the tachometer to my car so I ask you for the cable that goes to the engine from the tachometer and does not have 2 connections? one seen in the photo on the mudguard, the other on the distributor, but where ?? thank you very much for your help good evening  ciao


Hallo und 'Guten Abend allerseits, mein Name ist Peter und ich schreibe Ihnen aus Italien.
Ich wollte dich fragen, ob du mir in vielen Dingen helfen könntest, in denen ich viele Zweifel an meinen Maecedes habe. Ich möchte auch den Drehzahlmesser zu meinem Auto hinzufügen, also frage ich Sie nach dem Kabel, das vom Drehzahlmesser zum Motor führt und keine 2 Anschlüsse hat? einer auf dem Foto auf dem Kotflügel zu sehen, der andere auf dem Verteiler, aber wo? Vielen Dank für Ihre Hilfe Guten Abend cioa

gavin116

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #268 on: 10 May 2020, 02:37 PM »
Tacho 101 (revisited)

Hi Paraguaiano (Peter)

First and foremost, sorry for not replying to your request sooner, but I seem to visit the forum very seldom these days and with so little happening now with COVID on the scene… You can cut and paste and put this through Google Translator.

Please be aware that my vehicle is a 450SE with a V8 engine, quite a different beast to the 280S/SE/SEL with I6. So there may be a few differences.

Aquire a tachometer (rev-counter) that is specific to the I6 (in-line 6 cylinder) models; a rev-counter from a 350, 450 or 6.9 will not work properly. It can come from either a S-Class (type W116) or a SL-Class vehicle (type R107).

Get a 2 pole connector (comes in two parts) and 2 bushing connectors. These should be available from your local Mercedes parts department, I have put the part numbers after the descriptions. Round pin bushing for rev counter plug:  2x MA003 545 26 26, Cable connector for rev counter plug: MA008 545 37 28, Plug for rev counter plug: MA008 545 38 28.

You will need 2 lengths of wire; one sufficient to go to the fuse box, and one long enough to go to the LHS (left hand side) fender double-pole connector. These can be modern thin walled type rated to say 10 Amps (I mm diameter). ( Errata Re-reading the wiring diagram it says 0.75 mm diameter.)

Solder the positive wire to one bushing connector (goes to the fuse box), and a negative wire to another (goes to the fender double-pole connector). If you want to be absolutely correct, the positive wire should be coloured black with a red stripe, and the negative wire should be coloured grey green with a black stripe. (Errata Sorry checked my wiring diagram again and it said gn: green and not gr: grey. You will have to excuse my middle aged eyes! :o )

Place the 2 pole connector onto the back of the tachometer, it only goes in one way. The upper pole needs the negative wire, and the lower pole needs the positive wire. Leave a bit of wiggle room so that you can manoeuvre the tachometer wires to be able to connect and disconnect as needed when removing the instrument cluster in the future. Route the wires through the fire wall using the main grommet that takes most of the electrical to the engine compartment.

The wires can be placed in a plastic sleeve to to keep them together to a point near the fuse box. The positive wire needs a ring terminal soldered to its other end. (Do this after feeding the wires through the firewall as it may be difficult to pass the ring connector through the rubber grommet.) This is then connected to the number four terminal in the fuse box rated 8 amps.

A thinner plastic sleeve can be fed over the remaining grey green wire which should be routed to the double-pole terminal located on the left inner fender. A ring terminal is soldered on to this wire, and it is connected to the same terminal as the green wires.

Reconnect the instrument cluster and the battery, and you should be good to go.

Good luck.

P.S. when starting this job, disconnect the battery. When you pull the instrument cluster, make sure that you gently unscrew the oil pressure pipe. Under no circumstances start the car with this pipe disconnected as it will spray oil all over the interior of your car! Also that main electrical plug may be brittle after all these years and is easily broken if you man-handle it. When you re-install the instrument cluster, ensure that you do not cross thread the oil pressure pipe and do not over tighten it.
« Last Edit: 11 May 2020, 12:06 AM by gavin116 »

gavin116

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #269 on: 10 May 2020, 03:13 PM »
I have attached part of the wiring diagram too.

4 = instrument cluster, L = tachometer

26 = fuse box

sw = black
rt = red
gn = green