Author Topic: My first W116 here at last  (Read 104227 times)

1980sdga

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #60 on: 11 June 2011, 09:18 PM »
  Can anyone explain the styrofoam in the center?

I think the styrofoam insert covers up what would normally be the gear indicator for those cars with a column shift automatic.  On W126s, they have the same thing, but it's for the outside temperature gauge.



That makes sense!  Why didn't I think of that. I've seen the temp indicator in 126 pictures.

On my 300SD I have brake, seatbelt and glow plug lights. I like the look of the green though!

Again, Good job!
Jon


Little by little I have grown fond of the infamous Auto Temp II we have in our 116's

gavin116

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #61 on: 12 June 2011, 09:49 AM »
Of sensors and warning windows

Weekend's almost over, and here's a list of what I've achieved (on the roadside as I don't have access to a garage):

1)  Replaced my clock with a rev counter and all associated wiring.  However the rev counter is very bouncy, and reads high at
     low RPM (2500 RPM at idle, later about 800-900 RPM) until the unit has been working for a period of time.  It reads a whole
     lot better at speeds over 50 mph.  Anybody have some ideas?  Joe what about that pick-up point?

Speed vs RPM (both my hands are on the wheel ;D, the passenger is taking the photos, hence the slightly skew angle)


2)  Added a washer fluid level sensor and all associated wiring.  All working correctly, but sadly no check light with ignition in
     position II.  Bolbol, still waiting for the wiring diagram, photos and instruction.  It will be greatly appreciated.  No particular
     urgency, as I will only be springing Mrs White for the weekend in about six weeks time.  I changed all the washer lines for the
     windscreen with the new MB black tubing, it looks very neat (picture to follow).

Washer fluid warning system

3)  Added a coolant level sensor and all associated wiring.  Ditto the rest as in number 2.  Eagle eyed members will note an issue
     between the battery and the coolant level sensor.  It's a very tight fit, and therefore I could only utilise the top two retaining
     screws.  I haven't done anything with the single lower screw, as I don't particularly want to drill into the bodywork.

Coolant level sensor (sans the circlip in the top two photos)

4)  Changed all my coolant hoses, thermostat and replaced the coolant.  The new MB coolant is a turquoise colour.  My system
     used almost 10 Lt.  I though it was supposed to be about 17 Lt?  I did as Joe suggested, drained the system, ran it
     with plain water till operating temperature, drained it again, and filled it up with a 50/50 mix.  I didn't use any radiator flush
     as there was no signs of nasty pieces in the old radiator fluid, or the thermostat housing.  An airlock revealed the coolant
     warning light does in fact work!  The temperature now sits around the 175 oF irrespective of traffic conditions.

Bits and bobs for the coolant system (I didn't replace the small fat hose, but will when the water pump needs replacing, and the picture doesn't show the lower expansion tank hose or the MB coolant and de-ionised water)

5)  Swapped over the ballast resistors.  One of the screws was so rusted that I had to break the ceramic insulation off the
     resistor, and use a hacksaw to cut off the offending screw.  I cut some 4 mm stainless steel pan head screws to size to
     complete the job.  Also took care of a little rust beneath the old resistors.

The new ballast resistors (note the new securing s/s screws - must do the same for the 0.4 Amp resistor as it has the original corroded screws, also note the grey primer beneath)

6)  Touched up some paint chips.

7)  Replaced the graunched screw in the sunroof rail.  Todays persistent light rain proved too much for my sun roof, leaking on
     the front of the driver's side.  I suppose I will have to have it pulled and re-furbised, at the same time the hood lining can be
     renewed.

8.)  Replaced the broken plastic hinge in the boot on the spare wheel cover.

9)  Broke off some screws, yes that's right, several...  So, not a case of once bitten twice shy, but rather plod on at all costs to
     my peril.  Admittedly, they were for the cruise control actuator, and the car's ignition brain, both the items are screwed into
     the body work of the wheel well, which is rubberised.  I therefore couldn't spray them with penetrating fluid.  I will drill the
     screws on the cc bracket and replace them with stainless steel ones instead.  Will have to drill out Mrs White's brain in-situ.  I
     can then deal with the surface rust.  

     Anyhow, the news was good, the rust under the cc actuator is only surface rust, and it doesn't look like there is any
     penetration into the cabin.  (This would be the very same LHD fusebox weak spot that I am talking about, except on a RHD
     car this position is occupied by the cc actuator.)

10)  Still have the dead radio issue.  There is one brown wire going into the back of the radio, which has an earth label.  It looks
       as if it comes from the ashtray/cigarette lighter.  (There is 12 V on the contact points of the cigarette lighter.)  There is a
       blue wire that is connected to the +ve, via a random green wire that seems to come from the drivers side.  When I
       measured the voltage on that wire it's hot, and has 12 V.  The strange thing is there is only 2 volts when I measure at the
       the spade terminate of the blue piggyback wire?   And there is yet another blue wire connected to this spade terminal that
       disappears somewhere (I presume power for the antenna, which is oddly located more toward the rear on the RHS rear
       fender - usually located to the front of the LHS rear fender).

       Joe, where did you say is the best place to start from scratch when plumbing in new red and yellow wires for a modern
       radio, and also what point would make the best earth?  And what gauge wire should I use, 1 mm, 1.5 mm or 2 mm.  I am
       thinking of placing a fold out sat nav type receiver at some stage (Pioneer AVIC 6300BT).

Now, back to sensors and windows.  1980sdga, that little window as everyone has told you is actually for the column shift indicator.   However, when the R107 was showing its age, MB done some updating, some of these included the instrument cluster.  The changes are very subtle indeed.  The clock/rev counter was replaced with just a rev counter, the middle air vent becoming a clock.  The speedometer became semi-electronic, and there was an addition of an economy gauge to the temp/fuel/oil pressure cluster.  At the same time the row of warning lights were reduced in width, now accommodating 5 warning lights per bank rather than the four we are familiar with.  And the piece-de-resistance is a centre warning cluster for low oil level, low coolant level, low washer fluid level and finally a bulb-out check light.

I acquired one of these from MBUK at great expense to see if I could install it with my little upgrade.  I had to order it in at a little over £100, as it was not in stock.  And there is a no returns policy on electrical parts.  Despite studying some R107(revised) wiring diagrams, I cannot make head nor tail.  In the photo below you can see how perfectly it fits into my donor instrument cluster.  Any offers for the warning light cluster?

Piece-de-resistance

And the wiring diagram

The trip back to storage went very smooth indeed, stopped to fill up , as the tank showed just under a quarter, and I am not sure if the reserve light is working.  Mrs White's a heavy ol' girl to be pushing to a petrol/gas station.  She took 67.92 Lt costing £91.62.  She performed very well in the rain, surefooted, so much so that I didn't have to think twice about keeping up with the more modern cars (see speed vs RPM).  No fuel starvation issues this time, as my partner says, "Just like a horse, unhappy and  fighting when leaving the stable, but oh so happy to return"!

Mrs White and Delores (the SL) in London

Leaving ol' London Town (Hammersmith bridge - designed by Sir Jospeh Bazalgette, opened by the Prince of Wales on 11 June 1887)

Regards

Gavin
P.S.  For the purists, I still have the original wipers in the boot, the new Bosch ones work so much better in rainy England.  I shan't be getting rid of either.
« Last Edit: 12 August 2011, 09:49 AM by gavin116 »

1980sdga

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #62 on: 12 June 2011, 10:14 AM »
Wow, I love the center cluster! That'll be a really nice touch when you get it operational!

The Hammersmith Bridge looks like a huge bicycle chain.  Thanks for the picture!
Jon


Little by little I have grown fond of the infamous Auto Temp II we have in our 116's

jbrasile

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #63 on: 12 June 2011, 07:23 PM »
Hi Gavin,

Great pictures! Tough to work outside in these conditions.... ooouch....

To connect a modern radio I normally use the car's red/green wire  which is 12V powered when the key is in position I for the modern radio's red wire. If your car is still original that should be a female round connector, ideally you would install a male in the new radio's harness and just plug it in. The yellow wire which would be needed for the memory, settings, etc... I connect to the wire that goes to the internal light switch on upper part of  the console. You just remove the switch carefully, find the red/black (I think) wire and using a splice connector crimp the yellow wire in. Doing it this way you preserve the car's original wiring.

I am looking into the tach pick-up point schematic and will post it shortly.

Tks,

Joe


pompy

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #64 on: 14 June 2011, 12:03 AM »
Well done Gavin!

You really are getting stuck into that white 450 - I like the subtle upgrades.

Keep up posting yr progress.

Groete,

Le Fre
1991 500 SE EURO

Squiggle Dog

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #65 on: 18 June 2011, 11:15 AM »
Thanks for sharing the modifications! I have the same style wiper blades on my W116.
Stop paying for animal cruelty and slaughter. Go vegan! https://challenge22.com/

1967 W110 Universal Wagon, Euro, Turbo Diesel, Tail Fins, 4 Speed Manual Column Shift, A/C
1980 W116 300SD Turbo Diesel, DB479 Walnut Brown, Sunroof, Heated Seats, 350,000+

gavin116

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #66 on: 18 June 2011, 05:17 PM »
Hi there Scott

I really wish I could see more of Mrs White, and also to do more mechanical stuff.  I'm gathering a lot of the fuel components at the moment, but doubt I'll be able to install them on the roadside.  Having said that, I am always inspired how well you do on your drive, and the extent of the work you undertake!  I really enjoy your write-ups and the photos.  Your car must surely be almost 100% mechanically sound at this stage.  I can't wait till you get round to doing your paint job.  (I noticed that you have two rear interior light switches in your centre console, what does the second switch operate?)

When I next spring Mrs White I want to clean the engine bay, replace my coil, and see if I can start preliminary radio installation preparations.  I may want to remove the console to do this job, which I imagine will be a labour of love, and probably quite a steep learning curve.  I need to run new power feeds for the radio, and I will also need to run speaker wires to the rear as there are currently no rear speakers.

Regards

Gavin
« Last Edit: 18 June 2011, 05:19 PM by gavin116 »

Squiggle Dog

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #67 on: 18 June 2011, 05:34 PM »
Gavin,

My car is getting near 100%. I still have to replace the mismatched calipers (have an ATE on one side and a Bendix on the other--previous owner thing), replace the axle boots... not too much else, I guess, though I'm sure I'm missing something.

None of the switches above the heater faceplate are functional at the moment, but that's the way they came with the faceplate I bought (for $5, haha). I'll retain the dome light and defroster switches, but I will no longer need the power antenna switch since I am installing a manual antenna, and I won't need the sunroof switch as my sunroof is halfway through being converted to manual. I was thinking of putting the A/C on/off switch up there, but I don't know if I could make it work correctly.
Stop paying for animal cruelty and slaughter. Go vegan! https://challenge22.com/

1967 W110 Universal Wagon, Euro, Turbo Diesel, Tail Fins, 4 Speed Manual Column Shift, A/C
1980 W116 300SD Turbo Diesel, DB479 Walnut Brown, Sunroof, Heated Seats, 350,000+

jjb-w116-hu

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #68 on: 19 June 2011, 09:09 PM »
hi there - where did you get the parts tfor the washer fluid level warning system and Joe, would you know if i have a low OEL light? my oil pressure dropped suddenly (or least i noticed it after a long drive in the countryside) and panicked. how much oil should i be able to get in the old girl, i got close to 4 litres so it must have been pretty empty (according to dipstick!)

gavin116

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #69 on: 20 June 2011, 02:16 AM »
JJB here goes,

How to: Fit a window washer fluid warning system

1)  Time and patience:
This job is a little fiddly, pulling the wires into the cabin, and pulling the wires through the sleeves, especially if you want to make the harnesses look 'factory'.  And then routing the harness together with existing harnesses, luckily the MB cable ties are of the release type, which facilitates the routing.

2)  Tools for the manufacture of the wiring harness:
Soldering iron and solder
Wire strippers
Terminal crimpers
Cigarette lighter (to heat the heat-shrink)

3)  Tools to adapt the washer bottle:
Drilling machine
28mm hole cutter

4)  Tools for the job:
13mm Spanner (to disconnect the battery terminals)
8mm Spanner (to disconnect the bolt in the fuse fuse box to access the fuse rail)
Flat tip screwdriver (to connect the terminal to the fuse block)
Electrical fish-tape

5)  Parts List:
MA003 545 26 26 (x2)  Round pin bushing
MA011 545 71 28  Pin bushing housing
MA210 540 00 45  Washer sender unit (from a W124, can also use one from a W126)
MA000 545 19 19 Socket (bulb holders)
MN072601 012240  Light bulb
Automotive electrical wire (I used 1mm diameter, and I used two different colours)
Heat shrink (various sizes)
Cable sleeving (you could substitute electrical tape)
Cable ties
Spade terminal
Ring terminal
(All items with a part number were sourced from my local MB agent at very reasonable prices.)

6)  Method:
To begin, I soldered the wires to the round pin bushing and connected them to the housing.  I crimped and heat-shrinked a round terminal to go to the fuse box.  With the battery disconnected, I then fed the wire to the light bulb, using the rubber portal carrying the vacuum hoses to the cabin using an electrical fish-tape.  I then crimped a spade terminal onto that wire and insulated it with a sleeve, and placed the bulb and bulb holder into the number "3" position on the warning light row (i.e. a green light as this warning is informative, as opposed to a red light which is "STOP, act now!")

I used a dymo-labeler to print the icon, but you can also get warning symbols from a place like (Vehicle Wiring Products), see one of the pictures below where I was playing around just for fun.  (Any guess what I'm thinking about?  Auto lights and wipers could be in the offing...)  I stuck the label onto the coloured screen so that it wouldn't peel and collect dust from the outside.  My tip is that no matter what you use, the icon/lettering needs to go higher than you think.

Once the instrument binnacle was back in place, I disconnected the fuse rail (in RHD cars, there is one bolt, and one screw.  The relays have to be removed, as does the relay socket), and attached my ring terminal feed to the number 4 fuse position.  Everything was replaced, and the battery reconnected.  I cut a hole in the windscreen washer bottle using a hole cutter, and placed the sensor into the container and connected up the sensor plug.  Switched on the ignition, and you should get a green warning light.  Filled the washer bottle, and the light goes out.

I am still waiting on Bolbol to supply the details of the check light modification, which will give you the warning light with the ignition in position II, and then extinguish when you start the car, only coming on again if the washer fluid is low.

Just some photos showing the various tools needed for the job

Wire strippers, electrical fish-tape etc

Bulb holder, use position 3 for washer fluid, position 2 for coolant bulbs, icons on the various screens

Round terminal about to be connected, where I ran the cabling through the rubber grommet (a tight fit)

Electrical diagram
Good luck with the upgrade, and have fun!

Gavin

P.S. for those of you who want to do the coolant level sensor too, remember that it is a tight squeeze.  Here is the parts list in addition to the parts list for the washer fluid:
MA003 545 26 26 (x2)  Round pin bushing
MA011 545 71 28  Pin bushing housing
MA124 540 02 44  Switch (the actual sensor)
MA012 997 03 48  Seal ring air filter (to seal between the sensor and expansion tank)
MA126 500 15 49  Expansion tank
MN000471 030002  Snap ring (circ-clip to secure the sensor)
MA123 501 02 15 Radiator cap (optional, I just renewed it at the same time, you may need a different rating depending on your engine size)
« Last Edit: 12 August 2011, 09:52 AM by gavin116 »

jbrasile

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #70 on: 20 June 2011, 07:24 PM »
Gavin,

Congratulations again on a superb post!

Here are the pictures of the pick up point for the tach.

You should hook up the wire to the left screw on the fender connector and then run it through the fuse box grommet into the car.

The wire runs at the bottom of the fuse box and goes under the fuses.

Here is the connection at the fender block



Routing of the wire







Of course since you car is RHD, the routing of the cables will be a little bit different.

Hope this info helps and let me know if you need any more pictures.

Tks,

Joe

gavin116

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #71 on: 21 June 2011, 05:15 AM »
Dear Joe

Thanks for the info.  I used that exact outlet on the fuse box to run my supply wires for the tach and both sensor wires.  I look forward to moving the tach pick-up point next time I see Mrs White.  Hopefully no more bouncing needle.  I still need to look at my calendar and fix a date for my next visit/outing with Mrs White. 

Went to look at the radio, and have taken down a few measurements, so I can plan the radio exchange more carefully.  Did you have access to the actual depth of both front and rear speaker troughs?  The shallow fit speakers are about £69 - 90 a pair (fronts are coax, rear are x-overs), or if your music and car are your life, then there are uber shallow fits that cost a whopping £300 per pair.  The actual radio space also looks a bit limited to the rear of the radio.  Am I right to be worried about ventilation?

I will email you with some seatbelt part numbers I looked up on the EPC, (but I will need you to confirm I have the correct type for my car) and perhaps you can supply a quote?

Thanks for your unerring support,

Gavin

denis23

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #72 on: 22 June 2011, 02:47 AM »
Dear All,

I thought I might introduce myself now that I am the official owner of my childhood dream car, a W116.  Back in 1974 when I was going on five, my interest in motor cars was sky rocketed by this marvellous car.  Our next door neighbour (an orthopaedic surgeon) decided to spoil his wife: a 350SE in Sahara Yellow with Bamboo leather upholstery.  However not to be out done, the civil engineer living across the road from us, done very similar, and soon his wife too was driving a 350SE in Signal Red with Parchment leather.

Hmm...brand new S-class, does it usual for the wifes of surgeons and engineers in S.Africa for 70-ties? What car drove engineer and surgeons by itself?

gavin116

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #73 on: 22 June 2011, 05:59 AM »
Nostalgia time

Hi Denis, and welcome to the forum.

The surgeon was an eccentric Frenchman, and he drove a Citroen Pallas DS.  However, they always used the S-Class when going on holiday.  I suspect not only did it have more road presence, but more power and space as well.  They moved from Johannesburg to an industrial town called Vereeniging, and our families eventually lost contact.  His wife continued to drive the car for at least two decades, apparently it got the full house including a re-spray at the beginning of the 90's.  

The engineer (an ex Rhodie [Rhodesian]) on the other hand never seemed to be short on anything.  (Their house was one of the few in our street with a swimming pool, important when you're six years old, and you live in a hot climate.)  He drove a W108 280SE, it was a type of dull grey with a darker grey/chocolaty coloured roof.  His daily drive, and also the car they used most for towing a caravan and a boat was a Ford Ranchero pick-up (or as we used to call them in SA, a 'bakkie' - literally a 'tub' referring to the hold area).  Both their cars were replaced with 5 series BMW's in the late eighties/early ninety's when the E34 came to market.  They were much lesser cars than the Merc, could have been 525i 's.

Both of these neighbours were professional people who certainly had the means (you will recall in the early 70's R1 [one Rand] bought you £1 or US$2! the gold price was high, economy was booming, the rich got richer...).  It would be fair to say that it was unusual that there were 2 S-Classes within a stones throw of one another.  There was another darker red 350 that lived a few streets away, they were German expats, and I went to school with their older daughter.  And that was it for 116's.

As for the rest of us, we got by on much more modest means, my father worked for General Motors, so at the time, he drove a Chevrolet Constantia 5.0 V8 (about 1974), dark metallic turquoise in colour (what they now call 'petrol') with a brown vinyl roof.  My mum drove his old car, (which he took delivery of the day my sister was born) a 1966 Holden 186 Special, in light metallic turquoise with a white roof.  Sadly when the petrol crisis loomed, the Chevy was the first to go (my parents shortest-lived car), replaced with a second hand Mazda 616, and finally the Holden went, replaced by a VW Passat for my mum.

Found some of these photos, my mum's mini Mk3, she got the Holden when my dad upgraded it for the Constantia

The Holden 186 Special, what we called "Vanessa's car", as it also arrived on her birthday: 9th of November 1966

The Chevy looked similar to this one in this picture from an advertising brochure, I'll try to find an original photo



... Found some more photos.  The Holden was sold as parts were becoming a problem to acquire.  You will note that my mum had a little altercation and broken the rear tail light lens, and the front park light lens broke due to a flying stone.  The car would not be able to get its roadworthy certificate, and there were few Holden's of this era in the junkyards by the time my parents sold it (their longest surviving, and most loved car).  Despite this and the decorating my sister done to the bakelite dash pad using the cigar lighter, the car was accident and damage free for its entire life.  My dad always commented how this car with its 3 speed manual transition could eat any hill for breakfast.  Although it never had the cachet of a Merc, I thought you guy's down under could have a fond reminisce....

The front view of the Holden (notice the broken park lamp)

The rear view of the Holden (and the broken stop lamp, that sparked the sale of this car)

The only picture I have of the Constantia, unfortunately it has really faded



And this...

My first car!
« Last Edit: 12 August 2011, 09:54 AM by gavin116 »

gavin116

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #74 on: 08 July 2011, 04:13 PM »
This 'nd that

Hello again from a rather drizzly London.  

Yes, that's right, for two turns in a row, no sun, just rain.  What could I do but detailing.  So for starters, I thought that I might get my tacho hooked up to the new pick-up point.  When I went to fetch Mrs White last night, it was idling really roughly whilst I-pitched-my-tent and waited for the traffic on the A3 slip road onto the M25: it was true to form, Europe's biggest car park.  I instinctively wanted to rev the car to get it to calm down.  When I got home - without a hitch this time, I immediately rushed indoors to get a number 8mm spanner and a phillips screwdriver.  I swapped the pick-up point from the +ve side of the coil to the 'bipolar connector': not to the left, but to the right pole with the two green wires (as my connector is the exact reverse of Joe's).  And hey presto, the tacho was perfectly still and reading accurately.  Joe thanks again for the advice and pictures you posted for me.  What can we say, the last 10% of the job takes 90% of the time!

The new pick-up point for the tacho (you will note that I still need to deal with the rust beneath the ignition module)


So, jumped out of bed first thing this morning.  Ablutions done, two cups of coffee ingested and I was wired to go!  First off, I removed my old coil, cleaned up all the wiring and wire harnesses in that area, and reconnected my new coil (compliments of Joe).  I thought I would just try the engine to see if the new coil was up to the job, and it started first time.  The tacho read about 1100 - 1200 rpm, dropping down as the engine warmed up till it read less than 500 rpm (very lumpy then and the car shakes like a bronco).

The new coil in place, not blue though.  The area cleaned up nicely.


I then got Mrs White's newly refurbished headlight wipers out, and affixed them to the spindles.  I used a long reach socket and extension bar to do this, and the job was fairly easy.  None of the worrying problems that were mentioned by Joe about the headlight glass.  The tipping back of the arm gave plenty clearance, thanks for the heads-up on that tip Joe.

Headlight wipers reinstalled.  They were tested with the headlights on, and all functions perfectly - so 1970's!

Some of the tools for the FD filter and headlight wiper job. (Note the long reach socket.)


Next I removed my air cleaner, and then took out my fuel distributor filter.  My goodness, I think the Big Friendly Giant at MB must have tightened this component.  I nearly ruptured my abdominals loosening the filter.  Nevertheless, it came free nicely, and I replaced it with the new part,using one 17mm spanner to hold the filter in place whilst I tightened the fuel supply line to it.  The car turned over almost immediately.  (My accumulator seems to be fine then?)  I got the air filter back on, as it was still pi55ing it down with rain.

As the rain would not let up, I decided, "if you can't beat them join them", so what else to do other than break open a can of degreaser and get myself dirty!  I rigged up the hosepipe even though I didn't need to.  I washed most of the engine bay and then used a Brillo pad (steel-wool impregnated with 'pink' soap) on a few of the zinc plated fittings.  It all came up wonderfully well.  I plan to put some car polish on these fitting tomorrow to prevent them form 'oxidising' again.

I also went to town on Mrs White's wheels.  I cleaned them as thoroughly as possible without removing them from the car.  I thought that I might at some stage take the car to one of those places that will remove the tyres, acid bath the rims, prime them and paint them including an oven bake while you wait places.  Hence the easy option, although the wheels do look fine for the moment.

Not yet having my full, I yet again turned my attentions to the engine bay, and washed away like crazy.  I didn't tackle the engine block or the cam covers today, but I do plan on doing this in the future some time.  I was a little reluctant with the amount of water I sprayed to get rid of the soap suds and dirt, but in hind sight, I needn't have been fussed, as the car started first time following the 'wash'.  I also scrubbed the oily soaked bonnet lining, and this came up a treat.

An even cleaner firewall, showing the new windscreen washer tubing in black.  I think it's pretty neat.

The cruise control actuator that I need to re-mount

Another picture of the new coolant and windscreen washer tanks


I wanted to know if anyone has an idea what this 'blue' relay is for.  It is not original to the car.  It has space for a blade fuse, although there is no fuse present.  It connects to the alternator.

What is this 'blue' relay for?


Once I tired of cleaning in the engine bay, it was time to move my attentions to the radio.  I uninstalled the unit.  It has a built in fuse that showed continuity with the multimeter, but still it does not work.  The radio pick-up also showed 12 volts.  Something else must be wrong within the radio... I decided then to look at the mess of wires.  I found that the harness to the ashtray had been cut into to gain an earth, and at some stage judging from the teeth marks on the black wire, a quick connect for the +ve supply.  Lo and behold if the red and green feed wire still with it's factory bullet connector was not taped onto this harness.

Pray tell, why the heck cut into a harness when the wiring is right there?  I think I found the answer: the red and green wire is cold all the time (with the ignition off, in position II or with the engine running, in the latter two, there is a small amount of current, but no where near 12 volts).  Any ideas why this should be?  I am not sure where to begin looking, any suggestions would be helpful at this point.  I also discovered the original aerial wire going to the left side of the car.  Under the driver's side knee roll, yet another harness was cut into by a radio installer to supply power to the radio.  This time a red and white wire.  

Get this, the piggy back wire was too short to reach the console, so another piggy back wire is tapped onto the first wire about six inches from where it was tapped into the main harness.  What I found really gob-smacking was the fact the the end of the first piggyback wire was bare, live and left to dangle at its own free will... I agree with other members who have posted that radio installers should be shot, BUT not before they have their toenails pulled first!  I need to look for the electric aerial harness at some stage too.  I have just shelved the radio project for the time being.  I can play audio over the TomTom at the moment, not great, useful in stand still traffic, or I roll the windows down, and listen to the harmonic of Mrs White's V8.  

The original factory wires for the radio, but the red/green wire is cold all the time (about 1.2 volts, so not '0', but also not '12'???)

Having fiddled with things electric, I decided to remove the driver's side knee-rolls, and I pulled the cruise control amplifier.  I think I will send it off as I was quoted over £700 for a new one from MB.  At the same time, I ordered a few bits and bobs, and also got a quote for a new cold start valve and HT leads.  Joe, here's where you come in again, could you please give me a quote to supply the above?

Looking at Raptelan's  post, despite my car living indoors for most of its life, I too need new door seals, and window seals on the bottom parts of the windows.  Where does it all end...  I only just noticed that I am due a MOT and tax disc at the end of this month.  I think a visit to the SEC shop in Kent will be coming up soon.  Might ask them at the same time about re-commisioning the aircon.

Till later

Gavin

P.S.  Lastly, but not least, I adjusted the idle speed when warm and the gear selector in 'D' to about 700 rpm.  The car is so much smoother now at idle. :)

P.P.S.  Waiting for a sunny day to put the new fuel pump, accumulator and hoses onto the car.



« Last Edit: 12 August 2011, 09:57 AM by gavin116 »