Author Topic: My first W116 here at last  (Read 110560 times)

Greazzer

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #225 on: 28 January 2016, 06:32 AM »
Hey,

How did the aluminum hood and trunk lid work out finally?

gavin116

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #226 on: 28 January 2016, 01:10 PM »
Hi Greazzer

Nice to see you back on the forum.  The hood went on well, the strengtheners were removed (metal not aluminium), the respective pieces taken down to bare metal, primed or what ever the paint-shop needed to do, painted and then re-assembled.  Its on the car now.  When I went to close the hood for the first time at the body-shop, I was quite taken by the difference!  There is such a weight saving that it will not drop down into the shut position from say 12 inches like a metal hood.  The hood needs to be lowered by hand and the first click engaged. Then one needs to push down on the grille shell to push it fully home to the second click.  I suspect pushing on the hood could deform the aluminium.

The trunk lid was problematic to a degree.  The shut lines weren't perfect, and varied between 3 and 8 mm.  Being the perfectionist, it would have driven me mad, but that being said, it had to be pointed out to me first.  Things could have been sured up, but I was trying to keep to my already over stretched budget, so I pulled the plug on it.  (The ally trunk lid is now sitting in my front room looking for a new owner.)

When all was said and done, I blew the budget by such a huge margin, that in hindsight I should just have let them do the magic, and get it to fit.  Too late now, as the car is finished.  If I had easy access to another, I may have supplied them with a second trunk lid at the time, but not being in North America, it was logistically impossible to source and get shipped on time.

So, I guess you win some, you loose some, but overall very happy!  I'm signing off on the car tomorrow, and following it on the trailer to the storage facility.  Can't wait till the summer comes, we have already booked the Eurostar and our hotel in Piseport (Germany) to do a wine-run in Mrs W.

Many thanks for you help to supply the said parts.

Gavin

The trunk lid trial fitted on the car: http://forum.w116.org/test-drive/my-first-w116-here-at-last/msg121783/#msg121783
The hood during restoration: http://forum.w116.org/test-drive/my-first-w116-here-at-last/msg121926/#msg121926
And the hood on the car: http://forum.w116.org/test-drive/my-first-w116-here-at-last/msg124688/#msg124688
« Last Edit: 28 January 2016, 01:49 PM by gavin116 »

gavin116

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #227 on: 31 January 2016, 06:39 AM »
Nice touches

For those of you who have been following my story so far, you will know that I have just finished my body refurbishment project.  I fetched the car this Friday from John Haynes and she is now safely back in storage, some seven months later.

My brief before we began the restoration was to attend to rust on the front and rear wheel arches, and to tidy rust in the engine bay as far as possible.  I had agreed to a full windows out bare metal re-spray.  I had acquired a few bits along the way that would be replacing some of the old tired parts, mainly trim and rubber pieces.  As with all projects, I found it difficult to stick to my own brief, and soon Mrs. W was dictating…

So, in an effort to loose weight, I decided to replace the bonnet and boot lids with aluminium ones (from a 300SD), and to get more fresh air into the engine bay: I wanted to create some new air dams, then there were the less nice, but more practical alloy rims, and so it went.  Not to mention the fitting of a W126 auxiliary fan as an upgrade.

There were a few surprises along the way, notably from my part, although I had agreed not to do the underneath of the car at this stage, I had assumed my original quote included the lower sills and wheel tubs, apparently an assumption too far.  And so up and up the budget went, at least there were no time constraints, and the car could be done in between other jobs as it were, at a consistent but leisurely pace.

Whilst paint preservation was not really an option on the outside, we did try to preserve some of the car’s history.  You can see the sympathetic touches, for instance on the inner section of the doors.  Whist the outside, periphery and window frames were stripped back to bare metal, the inside panel retains some of the original paint and factory markings.  Especially inside the vehicle, most of my fittings and fixtures are original, and still very factory fresh.

There were lots of other little touches, such as retaining the tyre-pressure sticker on the inner surface of the petrol flap, or ensuring that the stone chip extends onto the inner lip of the wheel arch as per factory specifications.  Where needed we have went for new (when available, and where the budget permitted), like the trim clips and shims for the outer door moldings.  To this end, most of the external fittings have been renewed, especially things like the bumper bracketry.  Nothing taken off the car went back on unless it was neat, cleaned, refurbished and serviceable.

Whilst this will never be a concours winner, we have tried to stick to the original as far as possible.   But, at the same time, some functional alterations for example: new drains in the rear of the engine bay near the fire wall, as well as some modern technology has also been embraced: you will see the use of high-tech epoxy primers, high filler primer, under-coat, stone-chip, water-based base-coat (2 layers) and clear-coat (4 layers).  All in all, I should imagine we used close enough to the original factory specification of 32 kilograms of paint and body preservation wax.  In practice, hopefully this will be more serviceable, and last longer than the original paint the car left the factory in.

As the front end of the car had to be removed, now seemed like the best time to attend to the coolant radiator, which was not so good as it turned out, and had to be re-cored.  The air conditioner condenser was tested, and it only had to be treated to some combing and a new layer of ‘technical’ paint.  Then there was the pool of power-steering liquid under the car one morning, and so the steering-box had to be removed, and a new seal fitted.

Whilst the final bill was a sobering reality check, it was only whilst trawling through the shop photos that you begin to realise where all the money went.  Nice touches: like the cavity preservation wax behind the headlamp bowls, and re-painted inner surfaces of the bumpers in the original factory 158 whitegrey.  Not only the replacement of the vacuum elements in the central locking pods, but the body-shop also renewing all rubber connectors along the 37 year-old vacuum lines.  Or re-gluing the vinyl wrapping on the B-pillars where the old glue let go.  Or re-glueing the peeling factory parts sticker back on to the air conditioner dryer.  And, and, and…

So when all was complete, I hear you say, “Are you pleased with the result?”

Yes I am, but I still have a long way to go, she’s by no means finished yet.  Next on the menu: sub-frames and suspension components.

Keep 116ing, ;) 

Gavin
 
 
« Last Edit: 31 January 2016, 08:23 AM by gavin116 »

gavin116

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #228 on: 31 January 2016, 06:41 AM »
And some more photos
« Last Edit: 31 January 2016, 07:16 AM by gavin116 »

rumb

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #229 on: 31 January 2016, 07:36 AM »
Your car looks wonderful!  I'm sure you are proud. I appreciate the retention of labels.  It's the small things that make a difference.

Is it correct that the inside of the chrome bumpers are painted body color?  Also that the inside of the front fenders receive "shults"
'68 250S, '77 6.9 euro, '91 300SE, '98 SL500 '14 CLS550

Type17

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #230 on: 31 January 2016, 07:51 AM »
The inside of the bumpers on 60's Mercedes should be painted Mercedes White Grey (code 158), and if it's not the same colour for 70's cars/W116's, it's very similar.


Brilliant job, Gavin  :D

gavin116

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #231 on: 31 January 2016, 07:53 AM »
Hi Rumb

Thanks for the kind words. All those layers on the inner fenders I presume are correct, the body-shop like to do things as precise as possible and to M-B original standards where possible.  The inner surface of the bumpers is 158 white grey, see on an original rear over-rider that I bought to replace a dodgy one http://forum.w116.org/test-drive/my-first-w116-here-at-last/msg105722/#msg105722  The inner surface of the bumpers are not body coloured, my body colour just happens to be 'white', is 737 classic white, where I think the confusion sneaked in.
« Last Edit: 31 January 2016, 07:57 AM by gavin116 »

ptashek

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #232 on: 31 January 2016, 12:00 PM »
Brilliant result!
I'm all envious, yours is already done and I still have to wait for mine to get there :D
1993 "Pearl Blue" W124 280TE
1988 "Arctic White" W124 200T
1979 "Icon Gold" W116 450SE (history, resto)

revilla

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #233 on: 31 January 2016, 03:57 PM »
Double thumbs up Gavin.  She looks gorgeous!!!!

Too bad she went straight to storage.  I'd be itching to drive it after such long wait...

Robert
W116 1977 280SEL & 1979 280SE

w116john

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #234 on: 31 January 2016, 04:20 PM »
wow car looks really fantastic, well done enjoy it

john

floyd111

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #235 on: 01 February 2016, 12:14 AM »
She's a looker! Congrats!
Just, don't forget to polish that star! Missed a spot.

rumb

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #236 on: 02 February 2016, 05:57 AM »
ran across tis on sl113.org

Additional colors used on W113 vehicles:

Kofferraum innen: Tiefdunkelgrau, DB 164   Trunk inside: 164 dark grey
Heckdeckel innen: Tiefdunkelgrau, DB 164   Trunk lid, inside: 164 dark grey
Radkasten: Wagenfarbe UT   Wheel wells: body color
Schweller: matt schwarz DB 169   Rocker panels/Sills: flat black 169
Bumper innen: weissgrau DB 158   Inside of bumpers: white grey 158. Apparently RUST-OLEUM Painters Touch Ultra Cover 2x Almond Gloss is a good match in color and affords more rust protection (see http://www.sl113.org/forums/index.php?topic=10791.0)

(According to discussion on http://www.sl113.org, there are many cars out there where the rocker panels are in another contrast color, or in body color. Any color other than black is not original.)

(According to another discussion starting in January of 2011 titled Rocker Panel Color, the idea has been presented that the rockers were, in fact, a dark grey, and not black. Also, they seem to be more of a semi-gloss than a flat finish. Original cars, with an original owner in one case, give good evidence that the rockers are dark grey. Additionally, there is evidence that there was paint brushed on the light colored screw heads to camouflage them.)
'68 250S, '77 6.9 euro, '91 300SE, '98 SL500 '14 CLS550

adamb

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #237 on: 02 February 2016, 12:42 PM »
The car is looking great, Gavin. Sounds like you'll be ready for a reunion in the summer...

gavin116

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #238 on: 30 August 2017, 02:09 PM »
Oh, it's French inside

I know it's been an age, so time to catch up a little. So much has happened in a year and a half. Last time I made an entry on my 'blog', I had just enjoyed the delights of getting Mrs White back from her bodywork restoration by John Haynes. That was not unlike the feeling of driving off the showroom floor in a new car (and it still feels that way).

Roll on June 2016, and I took the plunge to enter Mrs White in the UK Mercedes Benz Club annual concors d'elegance. A lot of preparation went in to getting ready for the show despite the recent works. She was in a class for sedan vehicles over 30 years old. My main competitors were the smaller W123s. At the prize giving, I was absolutely bowled over when they announced the winner of this section and suddenly it dawned on me that it was my name they were calling out. Way to go Mrs White!

Our next outing was August where we once again made our way to the Mosel Valley in Germany. We had a wonderful trip as per usual, loaded up with some Riesling (the trocken variety mind) and put another good few trouble free miles on Mrs White. It was however becoming more and more obvious that the car was getting wallowy. She went in for her service, and then into storage for her annual hibernation.

A very long winter and spring was spent agonising about suspension work. I sent the car in for its service, and to replace the brake discs on the front, the auto transmission flexible cooling lines and install new window channel rubbers. All works were eventually completed but it did mean I couldn't make the concors or the S-Class day. It also means am now left with 4 new front window run rubbers as John Haynes managed to source some NLA rears from a secret source. I must put those up for sale. It also became apparent at this time that the front passenger electric window winder regulator which was 'repaired' in the past was close to failing. A newer stronger brace was added.

And so it was off to Rheims in France for some Champagne tasting, and from there on to Luxembourg. I collected the car, and we made our way down to Folkstone to spend the night, taking on fuel along the way filling the tank to automatic stop. I had just bought a new fuel sender unit as my old unit made for a very bouncy needle. Having pulled off the yellow safety sticker and removed the transport pin, I dully installed the unit on Friday morning prior to boarding the EuroTunnel, and no more needle issues.

However a new problem would soon raise its ugly head. I put the window down to get some directions from the staff, and when it came time to putting the window back up again: big problem. Something must have been left unsecured whilst the window run felts were being renewed. The window only went up by a margin before twisting and coming to a dead stop. A combination of hand manoeuvering and working the switch got the window up, where it was left for the rest of the trip.

I have to say that the car is otherwise performing flawlessly, and is such a pleasure to drive. The more miles, especially motorway miles you do, the better it seems to go! The car was parked for the next two days whilst we explored and tasted the delights of the region.

It was then time to decamp and head off to Luxembourg, at which time I pulled the car closer to enable packing our luggage. It was at this stage with the car closed that our young French doorman proceed to put our luggage in the boot. He went over to the passenger side door, opened it up to place two bottles of water in the console for our onward journey. With a startled and delightful look on his face he cried out, “Oh, it’s French inside!” I just love the way 116s always evoke such strong emotion.

And so we continued our journey along the motorway. Near the French boarder, we stopped at a rest area, where we encountered a German driver of a new A6 estate with his young son. He was just so taken with the car and was explaining to his rather bored son that his dad had this same model and colour car in the seventies. How we joked about the fuel consumption...

Then, just before the Luxembourg boarder at Thionville, (luckily only a few metres from an off-ramp on the motorway), the car gave just one jerk, and that was it. No more fuel, suffice to say no more bouncy fuel gauge also translates as no reserve light that I was faithfully counting on.

Somehow, we freewheeled off the motorway to a point of safety, used our mobile apps, and started to walk to the nearest fuel station. Big mistake, we should have rather followed the route for the biggest name as it was closed. Having finally bought a 10 litre jerry can and topped it up with Total, a few kilometres walking and two hours later, I turned the ignition on and off for four cycles, hit the starter and it sprung to life!

We took in lunch, and headed off for the Total once again. In all we managed to put in 97.69 litres (including the 10 litres from the jerry can) before the automatic stop kicked in. I can confirm on this amount travelling at 140km/hr (85 mph) with the air con going, you can get 384.5 miles in a 450SE before you run out of fuel!

Luxembourg was quite delightful, we soon experienced all of its tourist attractions. The last day of our holiday would be spent driving back to the UK, taking in Waterloo to see the monument there, and stopping over in Ghent for a late lunch. We set off at 08H00 in the morning, the only issue was dew on the rear window.

My rear window demister doesn’t seem to work. I have the “cheaper” version; toughened safety glass with horizontal gold stripes, not the compound glass with the almost invisible fine lines. When I push the button the icon lights up, but as I release it, the light goes out. Is this supposed to remain lit whilst the demister does its job?

I have a new relay I shall install as I think this could be where the problem lies. I will need to pull the dash instruments to get access. At the same time my indicators are still flashing perfectly well, but are now totally silent, so I have a new relay for that too whilst I'm in there. Hopefully I’ll have a fully functioning rear window demister and audible indicators. Has anyone else had success when changing these?

We had a great time exploring the Waterloo monument, and a little while later, had an equally interesting time exploring the road markings in the old town of Ghent! Not wanting to repeat our previous mistake of low or no fuel, we filled the tank to the top again in Ghent having used only just a whisker under an indicated half tank or 214.9 miles.

We had a great late lunch, and then a reasonably easy drive to the sous la Manche. That all ended at the boarder control where we had a very long hot wait in a queue that made banking and the post office look like an expedite service. Sadly Mrs White doesn't like queuing: her temperature rose alarming to almost the very top of the heat gauge. We resorted to all windows down (except mine :-[ ), the sunroof open, and turning the engine off between our glacial forward movements.

The rest of the journey was completed without any difficulties: all in all another 1000 or so miles racked up of pleasurable real motoring. It's always food for thought when we decamp in the Audi, just how much new cars drive themselves and how small the steering wheels are! ;D

And so in a few weeks, it's back to John Haynes to have the suspension works done, both front and rear. They did replace the rear shocks at the service as the old ones were leaking. Hopefully no nasty surprises and we’ll stay on budget…

Keep 116ing
 
« Last Edit: 30 August 2017, 11:56 PM by gavin116 »

ptashek

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Re: My first W116 here at last
« Reply #239 on: 30 August 2017, 05:30 PM »
Great write-up Gavin! Congrats on the concourse win. With the Club folks being quite competitive, it definitely is an achievement. But I need to ask - how did the judges miss those non-standard alloys? ;)

Looks like you've had your fair share of trouble too. You've really sucked that tank dry, including the all the vapours, given it's ~96 litres nominal capacity :) I got stuck in French traffic earlier this year, in near 40*C midday heat, and can totally relate to the W116 not liking hot weather at all. The engine coolant in Goldie didn't go up all the way, but she was struggling with keeping decent idle RPM, and the transmission was getting jerky. And I still have issues with hot-starting, despite everything having been replaced. With your engine temperature trouble, have you had issues with hot-starting after a brief pause?

It's great to see another restored W116 being used as intended :)

p.s.: The demister light should stay on for a few minutes, when it's switched off by a timed relay.
1993 "Pearl Blue" W124 280TE
1988 "Arctic White" W124 200T
1979 "Icon Gold" W116 450SE (history, resto)