Author Topic: My Custom 1980 300SD Project Part 2  (Read 13115 times)

Squiggle Dog

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Re: My Custom 1980 300SD Project Part 2
« Reply #225 on: 03 November 2019, 06:38 PM »
On August 1st, my dog Yogi drowned in the pool. I was looking around for him and couldn't find him but then noticed a dark spot at the bottom of the pool in the deep end.  I felt horror and said, "No, no, no!" and dove in and pulled him out. I tried pumping the water out of his lungs and gave him CPR, but there was so much blood coming out of his nose, and it didn't work. His lungs must have ruptured in his struggle to get out of the pool. I sat there in a daze and started sobbing. I had trained him to get himself out of the pool if he fell in, and in the past he had been able to find the shallow end.

I dropped him off at the veterinary clinic to be cremated and to have a plaster cast made of his paws. I cried for two hours. This is so difficult. He was 17 years old, but I thought he would live to at least 20--and at his age, I had expected him to pass away peacefully in his sleep; not like this! I feel sick when I think about him trying to get out with no one to help him. This is one of the hardest experiences I've gone through.

I had been wanting a dog for a while and was looking at Petfinder.com back in 2004 and saw Yogi's picture. I decided to go to the animal shelter in Ogden, Utah to look at him, but by the time I got there it was closed. So, I came back the next day and when I saw him, he was calm and rubbing up against the cage while the other dogs were barking. I got him out and took him for a walk.

The shelter said that he had aggression issues and was going to be put to sleep a couple weeks ago, but he was apparently showcased on Channel 5 News which bought him more time, but it was his last day--so if I didn't adopt him, he would have been euthanized the day after. I told them that I would foster him for a couple of weeks, and I ended up keeping him.

I got him home, made him comfortable in my room at my parents' house, and started him on vegan dog food (Natural Balance Vegetarian Formula). The neighbors across the street wanted to see him. He seemed to behave with their dogs and they told me to let him off the leash. I said that I hadn't trained him to come when called, and didn't feel comfortable with it. They said it would be fine, so I let him off the leash, and he ran away toward Main Street in Heber City, Utah. I ran after him and he ran out into the road and almost got ran over by a lifted truck. I chased him until I finally got him at the McDonald's.

I moved out of my parents' house and into a place in Ogden, Utah with a 1/4 acre fenced yard. He ran around the yard at full speed and was so happy, because all he knew before then was being on a leash. He would get hyper and run around the yard and then through one side of the house and out the other. His favorite thing in the world was to play fetch. He was obsessed with his ball and when people would walk past the house, he would grab his ball and run over to them and drop it over the fence.

I moved to Washington for better opportunities, and then eventually to Arizona after I got sick of the rain. I brought Yogi with me on trips and family reunions. He was a great passenger. He was so well-behaved that I could call his name in a barely audible tone and he'd come walking over. At the house in Washington he loved to eat blackberries off of the bushes and he'd have dark stains around his mouth. He'd also grab fruit off of trees and eat it. In Arizona he loved the dog park and the pool.

Yogi will be missed. He was special and probably as good as it gets when it comes to dogs. For the most part he was in extremely good health. Whenever I'd take him to the vet, they would comment on how fit and healthy he was, and when he had blood tests done, it was above average. I never fed him animal products the whole 15+ years he was with me. No meat, no eggs, no dairy. That's a testament to a plant-based diet, which even dogs can thrive on.

Bye, Yogi. I love you.





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1967 W110 Universal Wagon, Euro, Turbo Diesel, Tail Fins, 4 Speed Manual Column Shift, A/C
1980 W116 300SD Turbo Diesel, DB479 Walnut Brown, Sunroof, Heated Seats, 350,000+

Squiggle Dog

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Re: My Custom 1980 300SD Project Part 2
« Reply #226 on: 03 November 2019, 06:59 PM »
Not long after Yogi's death and my struggle of leaving religion, my roommate's 1991 W126 350SDL broke down. The fan clutch bolt came loose and it cut a hole in the radiator, destroying it and the fan blades in the process. The engine overheated. I drove my car to where my roommate was, swapped cars with him and waited for the tow truck. He's been driving my car for about three months now while I fix his.




Why so long? After replacing the front crank seal, radiator, hoses, fan blades, shroud, water pump, and thermostat (that thread is here: http://www.peachparts.com/shopforum/diesel-discussion/351809-gregmns-1991-w126-350sdl-has-new-home-7.html#94 ), it turned out the head had cracked and needed to be replaced. Fortunately, Diseasel300 saved the day with a good replacement head and additional parts at an absolute bargain. I'm getting near finishing the 350SDL, though.

Stop paying for animal cruelty and slaughter. Go vegan! https://challenge22.com/

1967 W110 Universal Wagon, Euro, Turbo Diesel, Tail Fins, 4 Speed Manual Column Shift, A/C
1980 W116 300SD Turbo Diesel, DB479 Walnut Brown, Sunroof, Heated Seats, 350,000+

Squiggle Dog

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Re: My Custom 1980 300SD Project Part 2
« Reply #227 on: 03 November 2019, 07:16 PM »
My 300SD has rolled over 350,000 miles and is due for an oil change. The weather started to cool down, and my roommate told me that the dashboard was making a loud shrieking noise. It's had this problem in the past and is related to cold weather and the speedometer cable. I've lubricated the speedometer cable, which kinda-sorta, but not really fixed it for a while. It's almost always hot here in Arizona, so it rarely poses a problem. But, this weekend while the car wasn't being used, I removed the instrument panel.

I did a lot of reading up on the subject, and it seems the true culprit is a bronze bushing pressed into the back of the speedometer, into which a shaft spins. I had already lubricated the speedometer gears a few years ago, but might not have oiled the shaft. I was warned to only use an oil suitable for bronze bushings--other oils or greases would clog the pores, while the proper "spout oil" would be soaked up by the metal for prolonged lubrication. I used a synthetic oil suitable for the purpose.


I inserted a square bit into the shaft so I could rotate it counterclockwise while oiling to let the oil work its way down. I could feel it free up the gunk inside and spin easier.


I also poured automatic transmission fluid down into the cable and made sure the cable wasn't bent. I put a little grease around the outside of the bronze bushing where the speedometer cable interfaces.
« Last Edit: 03 November 2019, 07:33 PM by Squiggle Dog »
Stop paying for animal cruelty and slaughter. Go vegan! https://challenge22.com/

1967 W110 Universal Wagon, Euro, Turbo Diesel, Tail Fins, 4 Speed Manual Column Shift, A/C
1980 W116 300SD Turbo Diesel, DB479 Walnut Brown, Sunroof, Heated Seats, 350,000+

Squiggle Dog

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Re: My Custom 1980 300SD Project Part 2
« Reply #228 on: 03 November 2019, 07:21 PM »
Of course, as I was putting the instrument panel back in, the bulb holder for the glow plug indicator light fell off of the wire harness.


I intended to solder it, but feared the heat would melt the plastic bulb holder. I wasn't able to get the tab pressed in so I could remove the metal prong from the plastic, so I decided to grind off the solder and then crimp on a connector.


Filed down and the hole punched out.


A new connector crimped and heat shrunk into place.


It was also a busy day of cleaning oil-fouled spark plugs in a 1965 W111 220S and checking the fluids, as well as airing up tires in all the Mercedes out front.
Stop paying for animal cruelty and slaughter. Go vegan! https://challenge22.com/

1967 W110 Universal Wagon, Euro, Turbo Diesel, Tail Fins, 4 Speed Manual Column Shift, A/C
1980 W116 300SD Turbo Diesel, DB479 Walnut Brown, Sunroof, Heated Seats, 350,000+