Author Topic: My Custom 1980 300SD Project Part 2  (Read 11313 times)

Squiggle Dog

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Re: My Custom 1980 300SD Project Part 2
« Reply #180 on: 18 May 2019, 10:47 AM »
I got new rubber grommets for the parking brake cables as the old ones were worn through and the metal was starting to cut into the cables.


I also got new locking nuts and washers for the differential.
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1967 W110 Universal Wagon, Euro, Turbo Diesel, Tail Fins, 4 Speed Manual Column Shift, A/C
1980 W116 300SD Turbo Diesel, DB479 Walnut Brown, Sunroof, Heated Seats, 347,000+

Squiggle Dog

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Re: My Custom 1980 300SD Project Part 2
« Reply #181 on: 18 May 2019, 10:48 AM »
The remanufactured CVJ axles had little breather tubes pinched in between the boots and the shaft. CVJ said I could remove them if I live in a dusty environment or if I wanted. I grabbed the ends with pliers and noted they stretched out quite a bit, almost to the point of breaking, but with very careful and steady force I pulled them all out and the boots still seem to fit tightly.


The new clips for attaching the axle shafts into the differential arrived. The old clips were a loose fit and I had hoped that new clips would fit snug and prevent me from having to play around with replacement spacers. Fortunately, the new clips fit nice and snug.

After installing the trailing arms and differential into the subframe, I lifted the trailing arms up to the stop and supported them so I could manipulate the ends of the axle shafts into place. Then I lowered the trailing arms to help seat them.


Some gentle taps with a rubber mallet were required to drive the axle shafts into the hubs so the bolt would reach.


After the axle shafts were installed (new deformable washers are needed), I checked the trailing arms to make sure the axle shafts were allowing the full range of motion. Then I torqued down the bolts for the trailing arm bushings as it's easier to move the trailing arms beforehand. I used physics to my advantage and tilted the whole assembly back onto the protrusion of the differential cover and rotated it on the cardboard so I could lay it down correct side up onto two moving carts.


I noticed that the threaded differential mounting tabs had small rocks and dirt underneath them which wasn't allowing them to fit flat against the sheet metal, and no doubt would have caused mounting issues. So, I removed them, soaked them in Evapo-Rust, and then cleaned out the body with a pick and compressed air. The compressed air worked well for blowing out all the dust and dirt from the body channels.
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1967 W110 Universal Wagon, Euro, Turbo Diesel, Tail Fins, 4 Speed Manual Column Shift, A/C
1980 W116 300SD Turbo Diesel, DB479 Walnut Brown, Sunroof, Heated Seats, 347,000+

Squiggle Dog

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Re: My Custom 1980 300SD Project Part 2
« Reply #182 on: 18 May 2019, 10:49 AM »
Installing the rear axle assembly by myself was easy with the proper technique. I rolled the assembly back to the vehicle on the carts.


Then I slid it underneath the vehicle until I bumped into the exhaust. I put a moving blanket over the exhaust system, and with the left rear hub floating over the top of it, I lifted up the rear axle assembly enough to slide out one of the carts so the assembly was now resting on the exhaust. From there I was able to center the assembly by sliding it into place.


I got new springs and spacers for the rear. I figured it's now or never.


The old springs actually don't seem like they lost any height and were probably fine, but I think the front left spring is sagging and if I have to replace the fronts anyway, I might as well do the rears, too.
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1967 W110 Universal Wagon, Euro, Turbo Diesel, Tail Fins, 4 Speed Manual Column Shift, A/C
1980 W116 300SD Turbo Diesel, DB479 Walnut Brown, Sunroof, Heated Seats, 347,000+

Squiggle Dog

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Re: My Custom 1980 300SD Project Part 2
« Reply #183 on: 18 May 2019, 10:50 AM »
A new rear subframe mounting kit was installed. It went in easily with dish soap and the pressure of the jack.


I lifted up the rear axle assembly enough to slide a jack underneath the differential and then lifted it up high enough to lift up each end of the subframe with separate jacks so I could get the mounts in position. Getting the assembly perfectly positioned was tricky, but I got the differential and subframe mounts installed.


I made sure to fill the differential before I forgot. Nothing but the best synthetic fluids allowed!


The shock absorbers are now installed and the vehicle is resting again on all four wheels. Now I can take a break and work on some other projects before I start back on installing the driveshaft and buttoning up the rear end.
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1967 W110 Universal Wagon, Euro, Turbo Diesel, Tail Fins, 4 Speed Manual Column Shift, A/C
1980 W116 300SD Turbo Diesel, DB479 Walnut Brown, Sunroof, Heated Seats, 347,000+

daantjie

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Re: My Custom 1980 300SD Project Part 2
« Reply #184 on: 18 May 2019, 11:02 AM »
Stellar work ;)!
Daniel
1977 450 SEL 6.9 - Astralsilber

revilla

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Re: My Custom 1980 300SD Project Part 2
« Reply #185 on: 19 May 2019, 01:29 PM »
Outstanding results SD!

I’m so FAR from being able to overhaul my axles. But your post is inspiring!  One day...

Not only you always explain the ‘what’ but the ‘how’ as well. If you deviate from the STD procedure you explain why. That makes the difference. Thanks.

Good luck with your next steps.

Robert




Robert
W116 1977 280SEL & 1979 280SE

floyd111

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Re: My Custom 1980 300SD Project Part 2
« Reply #186 on: 19 May 2019, 06:56 PM »
 I am gonna call my lawyer. With this quality of work I got a case getting you extradited to Taiwan!

Harv

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Re: My Custom 1980 300SD Project Part 2
« Reply #187 on: 20 May 2019, 08:37 AM »
I can't imagine how smooth that thing is going to ride.
1980 300SD
1983 240D
2000 E55 AMG

ptashek

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Re: My Custom 1980 300SD Project Part 2
« Reply #188 on: 21 May 2019, 03:28 PM »
I've always been a huge fan of your work SD, but this is stellar work, especially for a one-man job in what appears to be your driveway!? :)
Maybe you should hook up with that Pierre Hedary guy and do a Youtube feature about DIY maintenance of the W116 :)
1993 "Pearl Blue" W124 280TE
1979 "Icon Gold" W116 450SE (history, resto)
1977 "Milan Brown" W116 350SE (parted out)

Squiggle Dog

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Re: My Custom 1980 300SD Project Part 2
« Reply #189 on: 11 June 2019, 10:11 PM »
The new rear subframe mounts aren't collapsed as were the originals.


The rubber seals of the driveshaft centering sleeves were damaged, so I replaced them. I drilled a hole through them and then hammered an old ratchet handle into the hole. I cleaned around the interface area, applied Deep Creep penetrating oil, and put a long prybar at each end and rocked the prybars back and forth until after much effort the sleeves started to slide out. It took much persistence. "I want to break free!"



I sacrificed one of the old flex discs to make a tool for pressing in the new centering sleeves. There is a large washer in between, and it bent in the process.


After the sleeves were sunken in, I hammered them down to make sure they were fully seated.
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1967 W110 Universal Wagon, Euro, Turbo Diesel, Tail Fins, 4 Speed Manual Column Shift, A/C
1980 W116 300SD Turbo Diesel, DB479 Walnut Brown, Sunroof, Heated Seats, 347,000+

Squiggle Dog

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Re: My Custom 1980 300SD Project Part 2
« Reply #190 on: 11 June 2019, 10:22 PM »
I ordered new genuine Mercedes flex discs. Comparing them next to one of the old German-made Lemförders, they look almost identical other than the genuine Mercedes ones having the star logo and part number. They are probably made by the same company in the same factory, but in different molds and possibly with different rubber compounds.


The new bearing pressed into the driveshaft support by hand.


I put a film of automatic transmission fluid on the driveshaft and then carefully tapped down the bearing with a wide flat blade screwdriver and a hammer, alternating from side to side and making sure not to slip and punch into the bearing's seal. I also squoze the driveshaft between my legs to support it so the new centering sleeve wouldn't be hammered too hard against the block of wood on the ground.


I don't have a good set of snap ring pliers and I destroyed the original snap ring and shields in the process. I ordered new ones and slid them down into place.
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1967 W110 Universal Wagon, Euro, Turbo Diesel, Tail Fins, 4 Speed Manual Column Shift, A/C
1980 W116 300SD Turbo Diesel, DB479 Walnut Brown, Sunroof, Heated Seats, 347,000+

Squiggle Dog

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Re: My Custom 1980 300SD Project Part 2
« Reply #191 on: 11 June 2019, 10:31 PM »
I greased the splines of the driveshaft halves, assembled them together noting they went back in the same orientation as they were removed (so as to not disturb the balance), and installed a new rubber boot.


I put Corroseal rust converter on the driveshaft to make it look nicer and protect it from rust.


The captive nuts in the driveshaft tunnel had grit under them, so I removed and cleaned them, then scraped and blew compressed air inside the bracket to get the dirt out.


The driveshaft in place. I did not replace the universal joint because I ran out of funds and am hoping that because the driveshaft is in a straight line that it will last a very long time.
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1967 W110 Universal Wagon, Euro, Turbo Diesel, Tail Fins, 4 Speed Manual Column Shift, A/C
1980 W116 300SD Turbo Diesel, DB479 Walnut Brown, Sunroof, Heated Seats, 347,000+

Squiggle Dog

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Re: My Custom 1980 300SD Project Part 2
« Reply #192 on: 11 June 2019, 10:55 PM »
I got my car to the point a while back where it doesn't drip any fluids on the ground--except for the control pressure rod shaft seal on the side of the transmission, and it's been driving me crazy because it leaves a puddle under the car. Unfortunately, it is not possible to replace the shaft seal without completely disassembling the transmission and pulling out the gear set. How awful is that? Here is what the shaft looks like from the outside, with the lever removed from it:


The seal is not located at the outside of the case, but rather it's on the shaft close to the inside of the case. In order to replace the seal, the shaft has to slide out from the inside of the transmission, but one of the drums is blocking it. I really dislike this design and want to change it. I thought about having the case bored so a lip seal could be installed on the outside of the case. But, this wouldn't work because the shaft steps down at the area where it would need to seal.

Then I had another thought--the lever welded to the shaft on the inside of the transmission is keyed, so if the weld was ground off, the lever could be removed and then the shaft could be drilled, threaded, and the lever made to be removable with a screw, allowing the shaft to be removed from the outside. I had envisioned removing the valve body on my transmission, taping a plastic bag around the area where I would need to grind off the welds to prevent contaminating the transmission with metal particles, and then doing the modification so I could replace the seal without taking apart the transmission. But, there is just not enough room to reach a tool in there. Oh, well. I still might do it when it comes time to rebuild the transmission.


In the past I had attempted to stop the leak by putting an O-ring on the shaft, sliding it up against the case, and then letting the force of the nylon washer and the spring washer push against it. It did not work. But, I tried it again using a thicker Viton O-ring, size 8mmIDX12mmOD.


I put the nylon washer and spring washer and clip in place against the O-ring, and though it felt like they were pressing hard against it, I noticed the nylon washer was deforming at the open end of the clip. So, I replaced it with a steel washer from a flex disc bolt of similar dimensions (11mmIDX18mmODX1.5mmT)--I think the nylon washer had a 10mm inner diameter, though.


It was a bit difficult to get the spring washer and clip on after the O-ring and steel washer, but it was putting firm pressure against the O-ring.
« Last Edit: 12 June 2019, 12:56 AM by Squiggle Dog »
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1967 W110 Universal Wagon, Euro, Turbo Diesel, Tail Fins, 4 Speed Manual Column Shift, A/C
1980 W116 300SD Turbo Diesel, DB479 Walnut Brown, Sunroof, Heated Seats, 347,000+

Squiggle Dog

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Re: My Custom 1980 300SD Project Part 2
« Reply #193 on: 11 June 2019, 11:35 PM »
It actually worked! Ever since I shoved an O-ring of the proper size in there, it hasn't leaked at all. Now I can have a spot-free driveway without having to rebuild the transmission.


Unfortunately, a leak had also developed at the selector shaft seal. But, this seal is located on the outside of the case. Unfortunately, the proper way to replace the seal is to remove the entire rear cone of the transmission so the shaft can be unclamped and then slid out of the case. The reverse lights were working intermittently and then not at all, so I suspected the neutral safety switch. I had purchased a new switch a while back, but when I pulled off the wire plug (which wasn't staying together), one of the terminals fell off. So, it was clear that the non-functioning reverse lights was due to broken wiring. I pulled the plug up into the cabin and soldered the terminal back in place.


The wire tubing was cut where it used to attach to the connector. I knew electrical tape wouldn't hold up, so I used heat shrink tubing. But, the problem I had was I didn't have heat shrink tubing large enough to fit over the large half of the connector, and any heat shrink tubing which would fit over it wouldn't shrink down small enough to fit over the tubing I was trying to mend. I took a chance and put a section of heat shrink tubing over large needle nose pliers and I carefully opened the pliers, thus stretching the tubing until it was eventually about twice the original diameter. Then I slid it over the connector and shrank it down to size. Even though it had stretched so much, it still worked!

I had purchased a new Bakelite connector thinking it was why it wasn't staying together, but it was that the larger plastic counterpart (which is no longer available) had tabs that weren't gripping the Bakelite part. So, I very carefully heated the plastic part with a heat gun and then bent in the tabs as far as I could and held them until they cooled. It worked!


I had a new selector shaft seal which I purchased four years ago and didn't install because it wasn't needed at the time. I decided that I didn't want to remove the tail cone of the transmission in order to replace the selector shaft seal, and since the seal is on the outside of the case, I took a small flat blade screwdriver and tapped it into the seal so I could remove the seal. After much work, the seal came out, but to my horror the selector shaft was very deeply gouged all over the seal surface from tapping in the screwdriver. I was in disbelief and wish I wouldn't have messed with it, as now not only would I have to take off the tail cone anyway, but I'd have to get a new selector shaft on top of more seals and gaskets.

I had planned on having to buy the parts (with money I don't have) and go through the whole process, but in order to keep contaminants out of the transmission, I put a little sealant on the outside of the seal and then tried to push it over the shaft, but there is a sharp lip that makes it very difficult to do, which is yet another reason why the shaft is supposed to be removed when the seal is installed. I tried to tap it in place, but it wasn't going in straight. I pulled the seal back out (and scratched the steel outer diameter in the process), but went too far and it came off the shaft, when I noticed that the sharp edges of the shaft had cut the seal. I applied more sealant to the outer diameter, forced the seal back on and tried to tap it in again. It was going in crooked, but I didn't care. I just kept tapping it into place and denting it in the process. Then I installed the neutral safety switch and selector shaft rod.

The next day I went out to the car and looked under it, hoping it wasn't leaking too much. To my surprise it was completely dry. There was no leak anymore! Somehow the seal must have contacted a very small part of the shaft where it wasn't gouged, and there must be enough pressure against the seal that the cut isn't leaking. What a relief! I still eventually want to fix it correctly, but that can wait. It is so wonderful having a transmission that doesn't leak!


My car doesn't leak on the driveway anymore! Yay!
« Last Edit: 12 June 2019, 11:04 AM by Squiggle Dog »
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1967 W110 Universal Wagon, Euro, Turbo Diesel, Tail Fins, 4 Speed Manual Column Shift, A/C
1980 W116 300SD Turbo Diesel, DB479 Walnut Brown, Sunroof, Heated Seats, 347,000+

Squiggle Dog

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Re: My Custom 1980 300SD Project Part 2
« Reply #194 on: 12 June 2019, 12:16 AM »
When I had an auto transporter deliver my car from Washington to Arizona when I moved several years ago, they broke and bent one of the tabs (of unknown purpose, but which only appear on North American models), along with lots of other damage to my car and my roommate's cars. But that's a story which has already been told. I had to bend the tab out of the way so I could remove the bolts for the rear sway bar.


I installed new sway bar bushings and end links as the old ones had broken.


I installed new parking brakes four years ago, but I was reading the factory service manual and thought that I had the adjusters installed backwards because the manual reads:

"Attention!
Adjusting direction of screw driver for moving brake shoes against disc:

Left side: from bottom to top

Right side: from top to bottom
"

I noticed that my adjusters worked the opposite way, so I pried apart the brake shoes and flipped the adjusters around.


But then I noticed that the manual also says:

"Install adjusting device in both brake shoes, so that adjusting wheel of diagonal swing axle faces forward."

That's the way I originally had them installed (also in accordance with the accompanying picture), and it goes contrary to the direction it says they are rotated to move the shoes toward the disc. There must be a translation error. I decided to put the adjusters the way I had them before, with the adjuster wheel pointing forward, and the way the pictures show. The manual must have left and right sides mixed up with regards to in what direction to move the adjusters.

I cleaned up the brake parts and lubricated the pins and back of the pads. I noticed some brake fluid leaking at the pistons, and the boots have some tiny holes in them. I wonder if the fluid leaking is because I pushed in the pistons when I wedged a carpenter's pencil in there. The calipers were brand new (not remanufactured) eight years ago.


My car is missing the heat shield that goes under the driveshaft. I removed the one from the 280SE parts car I had, and when I did a test fit I found that it will not work; the bolt holes are way off. How odd... You'd think they were all the same?
« Last Edit: 12 June 2019, 12:20 AM by Squiggle Dog »
Stop paying for animal cruelty and slaughter. Go vegan! https://challenge22.com/

1967 W110 Universal Wagon, Euro, Turbo Diesel, Tail Fins, 4 Speed Manual Column Shift, A/C
1980 W116 300SD Turbo Diesel, DB479 Walnut Brown, Sunroof, Heated Seats, 347,000+