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How to burn rubber in 6.9?

Started by raueda1, 20 December 2022, 08:36 PM

raueda1

So many movies and videos seem to do this.  I'm curious how, cause I've never seemed to come close driving in a straight line.  Maybe HP loss from high altitude (~40 hp loss)?  Maybe my engine is just anemic?  Maybe oversize tires just grip too well (235/60-15's not 205/75-14's or whatever OE was)?  Need to be cornering to unweight inner tire?  Lacking technique or just too timid?  To be clear, this isn't something I'd normally subject the car (or tires!) to.  Still, I'd like to know it's possible just in case.  ;D  Cheers,
-Dave
Now:  1976 6.9 Euro, 2015 GL550
Before that:  1966 230S, 1964 220SE coupe, 1977 Carrera 3.0

rumb

Id like to see if you could press both gas and brakes, then slowly let off brakes until rear tires start spinning. Those guys on Hotrod Garage seem to do that with every car they have.

https://youtu.be/7otPz_T_ONk
'68 250S
'77 6.9 Euro
'91 300SE,
'98 SL500
'14 CLS550,
'16 AMG GTS

raueda1

Quote from: rumb on 21 December 2022, 03:59 PMId like to see if you could press both gas and brakes, then slowly let off brakes until rear tires start spinning. Those guys on Hotrod Garage seem to do that with every car they have.

https://youtu.be/7otPz_T_ONk
I've seen this vid before and wondered about it.  My car is pretty zippy, especially at sea level, but can't come close to this.  I'm thinking that OE-sized tires play a bigger role than I've supposed.  Anyway, what's risk of damaging torque converter or tranny with the gas+brakes trick?  And how much gas?
-Dave
Now:  1976 6.9 Euro, 2015 GL550
Before that:  1966 230S, 1964 220SE coupe, 1977 Carrera 3.0

Eyeman

Back in the 90s when I'd regularly drive my Euro 6.9, I'd frequently do a 1-2 second burnout and not even realize I was spinning.  It usually happened on side hill take offs.  I did have 255ish rear tires then also.
1963 190SL(project)
1977 6.9 (Euro)
1994 Porsche 968 Cabriolet
1994 Porsche 968 Coupe
2008 BMW 135
2017 AMG GTS

nathan

The euros have just that bit more power to spin tyres, ive noticed this having owned a few.  also your oversized tyres will definitely make it more grippy. even old tyres make the difference when hard.
1979 116 6.9 #6436
2018 213 e63
2011 212 e63
2011 463 g55
2007 211 e500 wagen
1995 124 e320 cabriolet
1983 460 300gd
1981 123 280te

raueda1

Thanks to all for the comments.  Certainly larger, grippier tires don't help, but this gives me few ideas.  I'm really not the burning-rubber type, but it would be nice to know how should the need arise. ;)  Holiday Cheers!
-Dave
Now:  1976 6.9 Euro, 2015 GL550
Before that:  1966 230S, 1964 220SE coupe, 1977 Carrera 3.0

BigGreenMachine

It's almost certainly the large tires giving you "too much" grip - for this context anyway.

You could indeed try power braking like others here have suggested - pressing both pedals then letting off the brake until the rears break loose and spin - but that's far rougher treatment than I'd ever choose to inflict on these fine machines. In a rental car with full coverage on a short trip out of town? Sure no problem - light them up and spin!

Chris Harris did a fun video on just this topic - showing how changing tire size can dramatically alter your car's expression of power.


Randys01

Std tyre size for 6.9 was 215 x 70 x14. I put a new set on recently. There are not many choices avail.
 
These partic tyres are not fit to act as tyre buffers on a tug boat. 

For some reason the actual tread face appears  to have the footprint of 185!?
The tyres squeal in a straight line?!

They were obviously only intended to hold up the four corners of a 1965 Chev.
Their on road performance is below that of a cross ply tyre. I do not trust the car one iota.
I can light the rear end up any time. I cannot believe it.

So they are for the dump and I will have to repurchase 225 X65 X14...which are also becoming scarce but at
least there are some brand names still avail.

Oh how Id luve some new Michies but at 800 $A each?!... is just to outareach.

 

raueda1

Quote from: BigGreenMachine on 26 December 2022, 05:00 PMIt's almost certainly the large tires giving you "too much" grip - for this context anyway.

You could indeed try power braking like others here have suggested - pressing both pedals then letting off the brake until the rears break loose and spin - but that's far rougher treatment than I'd ever choose to inflict on these fine machines. In a rental car with full coverage on a short trip out of town? Sure no problem - light them up and spin!

Chris Harris did a fun video on just this topic - showing how changing tire size can dramatically alter your car's expression of power.

Thanks, this is great!  Pretty much cliches the tire theory and I'm not willing to do the braking/throttle thing. More on grippy below...
-Dave
Now:  1976 6.9 Euro, 2015 GL550
Before that:  1966 230S, 1964 220SE coupe, 1977 Carrera 3.0

raueda1

Quote from: Randys01 on 26 December 2022, 08:45 PMStd tyre size for 6.9 was 215 x 70 x14. I put a new set on recently. There are not many choices avail.
 
These partic tyres are not fit to act as tyre buffers on a tug boat. 

For some reason the actual tread face appears  to have the footprint of 185!?
The tyres squeal in a straight line?!

They were obviously only intended to hold up the four corners of a 1965 Chev.
Their on road performance is below that of a cross ply tyre. I do not trust the car one iota.
I can light the rear end up any time. I cannot believe it.

So they are for the dump and I will have to repurchase 225 X65 X14...which are also becoming scarce but at
least there are some brand names still avail.

Oh how Id luve some new Michies but at 800 $A each?!... is just to outareach.
 
Clearly I've taken my car in the opposite direction!  When I got the car it had 215/70-14 Michelin snow tires.  It was simply frightening to drive.  Within a couple weeks those were replaced by Pirelli 235/60-15's on Bundt copies.  The difference was astounding, car was glued down.  Later strut rebuild improved matters further - stiffer, way better balanced (front struts were "soft" so car would wallow during hard cornering).  Car now handles about as well as a 4500 lb car possibly could, yet without the "sport mode" harshness that seems to be so fashionable these days.  So I guess losing the burn-out trick isn't a bad trade off. 

Randy, unless you're a hard core originalist I'd strongly recommend going up to 15" and maybe 225's (235's are borderline with wheel arch clearance).  The improvement is not small!  ;D  Anyway, Ticket closed.  Thanks and Happy New Year!  Cheers,
-Dave
Now:  1976 6.9 Euro, 2015 GL550
Before that:  1966 230S, 1964 220SE coupe, 1977 Carrera 3.0