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Worn camshaft lobe

Started by Jakob, 05 February 2010, 11:47 PM

Jakob

Thanks everyone. WGB, does it specifically mention that the Australian camshafts are the same as the american ones? I was under the impression that the Australian engines were different from the US ones, with higher compression, although not as high as the euros. Could the australian camshafts actually be the same as the euro ones, with the difference being in the heads and pistons?

Also, before I get the new timing chain I'd better check, there's no differences between timing chains for any engines, euro or otherwise?

WGB

The EPC lists Standard and 3 levels of emission gear for K-Jet motors but does not elaborate on the camshafts.

For interest the Right Camshaft is given as A117 051 01 01 and the left is A117 051 00 01.

I have only ever owned Euro's and have no experience with Aus Cars but my simplistic understanding is that in K-Jet models  US and Aus share the same 8:1 motor, radiator and transmission oil pump with differeing levels of ancillaries added for emmission control due to the different specs required.

Bill

TJ 450

Here's some pics.

Left = Euro; Right = Aus.




The ones in the plastic bags below are marked P01, and are the ones out of my Aus. 450.

There are no 117 part numbers at all, and all other numbers are identical between them all.

Tim
1976 450SEL 6.9 1432
1969 300SEL 6.3 1394
2003 ML500

TJ 450

Quote from: Jakob on 09 February 2010, 05:02 AM
I was under the impression that the Australian engines were different from the US ones, with higher compression, although not as high as the euros. Could the australian camshafts actually be the same as the euro ones, with the difference being in the heads and pistons?
That's what I'm thinking. Though with a 6.9, the Aus. engines appear to be US units.

Quote
Also, before I get the new timing chain I'd better check, there's no differences between timing chains for any engines, euro or otherwise?
They are the same, although the Euro tensioner is different, as it has no air injection port.

Tim
1976 450SEL 6.9 1432
1969 300SEL 6.3 1394
2003 ML500

Jakob

The camshaft is in and both sprockets and the timing chain are replaced. The only thing I haven't done yet is install the tensioner. Is the hinged piece of metal the tensioner pushes on meant to be able to move against the chain at all with a new chain? It seems very very firm and I'm wondering if it's somehow stuck on something. It was moving freely before I put in the new chain.

Other than that it's all good! Thanks for all the information regarding camshafts. It does seem that the Australian and Euro 450 engines do share the same cams.

s class

With a new chain, there will not be much slack in the chain.  You need to gently turn each camshaft backwards slightly with a spanner to ensure there is no chain slack on the 'tight side' - in other words, gather up all the chain slack at the tensioner area of the engine.  Then the tensioner can just be fitted  - the plunger will be almost completely compressed. 


[color=blue]'76 6.9 Euro[/color], [color=red]'78 6.9 AMG[/color], '80 280SE, [color=brown]'74 350SE[/color], [color=black]'82 500SEL euro full hydro, '83 500SEL euro full hydro [/color], '81 500SL