Author Topic: What's the name of this thing?  (Read 3490 times)

1980450sel

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What's the name of this thing?
« on: 13 December 2009, 10:20 PM »
As you can see this part needs replacing, but to make sure I order the right part I was wondering if anyone out there knows the proper name of it? It's on a 1980 450SEL 4.5L Canadian model. I think it must have something to do with pollution control.

Don't you love the red heater hose, the kinking really helps restrict airflow.

Scott
« Last Edit: 14 December 2009, 09:21 AM by 1980450sel »
1980 450 SEL

s class

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Re: What's the name of this thing?
« Reply #1 on: 14 December 2009, 12:45 AM »
That there is the early style egr (exhaust gas recirulation) valve, I believe. 

'76 6.9 Euro, '78 6.9 AMG, '80 280SE, '74 350SE, '82 500SEL euro full hydro, '83 500SEL euro full hydro , '81 500SL

1980450sel

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Re: What's the name of this thing?
« Reply #2 on: 14 December 2009, 07:16 AM »
I don't believe it is the EGR valve. I think this part is exclusive to North American models. I think it's either called a check valve or an aspirator valve but my Haynes manual is so vague. It has diagrams just for US models 1977-80 but they just don't quite match up to what's in my car.

Scott
1980 450 SEL

TJ 450

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Re: What's the name of this thing?
« Reply #3 on: 14 December 2009, 07:50 AM »
Does the hose connect to the air cleaner? It looks like it's part of the air injection system, one of the check valves, but in a configuration I've never seen before.

Tim
1976 450SEL 6.9 1432
1969 300SEL 6.3 1394
2003 ML500

1980450sel

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Re: What's the name of this thing?
« Reply #4 on: 14 December 2009, 09:20 AM »
Hey I figured out how to embed a photo. I'm a little slow.
This picture nicely shows the location



Scott
1980 450 SEL

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Re: What's the name of this thing?
« Reply #5 on: 14 December 2009, 10:02 AM »
It looks like a setup similar to the W126 air injection, getting clean air from the intake. That setup doesn't appear to be in the EPC.

It would be worthwhile taking a photo of the end of the pipe down the side of the engine, too. This would give a better idea of actual function.

I notice that you have a 1980s-style air cleaner, plus a battery heat shield. Most interesting.

Tim
1976 450SEL 6.9 1432
1969 300SEL 6.3 1394
2003 ML500

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Re: What's the name of this thing?
« Reply #6 on: 14 December 2009, 10:53 AM »
Is it this?



autohausAZ describes it as

"Air Pump/Smog Pump Check Valve
For Federal (non-California) models with engine serial number from 018013. For California models with engine serial number from 052294. 1 per car. "

It appears to be photographed from below, whereas your pictures are from above. 

'76 6.9 Euro, '78 6.9 AMG, '80 280SE, '74 350SE, '82 500SEL euro full hydro, '83 500SEL euro full hydro , '81 500SL

Papalangi

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Re: What's the name of this thing?
« Reply #7 on: 14 December 2009, 12:34 PM »
That should be it.

Isolates the smog pump (air injection pump) from the air cleaner.  Mine seems to have a cap brazed onto the hose end.  Not sure how that happened.

Michael
1976 450SEL, 116.033  Sold it to buy a '97 Crown Vic.  Made sense at the time.
1971 250C, 114.023      Sad but true, it's gone to a new home.
1976 280C  Stolen by the City of Seattle, sort of.
1970 250/8, traded in on a 1993 Land Rover Disco

1980450sel

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Re: What's the name of this thing?
« Reply #8 on: 14 December 2009, 03:58 PM »
Thanks to everyone that helped. That is the correct description. I guess it also is called the Air Injection Check Valve.
Here's a view from the opposite side sort of from underneath



And Michael, I would assume that yours has been repaired because it probably used to look like mine.

I know this is a lot to ask, but could someone explain what this does in relation to smog control? And since mine is obviously not preforming to spec how is this effecting the drive-ability?

Thanks,

Scott
1980 450 SEL

Papalangi

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Re: What's the name of this thing?
« Reply #9 on: 14 December 2009, 11:21 PM »
Actually, it was on the 1976 280C that it was brazed closed and it may have been me that did it. ;)

The valve isolates the air cleaner side from the smog pump.  It prevents backfires from damaging the pump and other bits.

If you don't have visual smog inspection where you live, you don't really need to replace it.  Your pump probably seized 10 or 15 years ago.  If you were in California, everything must be there and working.

http://handbook.w116.org/Engine/107/M117_45/1977/14-050.pdf
will tell you far more than I can even remember about the emission controls.

I don't have one on my car as I have catalyitic converters.

Michael
1976 450SEL, 116.033  Sold it to buy a '97 Crown Vic.  Made sense at the time.
1971 250C, 114.023      Sad but true, it's gone to a new home.
1976 280C  Stolen by the City of Seattle, sort of.
1970 250/8, traded in on a 1993 Land Rover Disco

1980450sel

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Re: What's the name of this thing?
« Reply #10 on: 14 December 2009, 11:37 PM »
I wish I was in California! It's -32 Celsius or -26 Fahrenheit right now and it sucks. Thanks for the info Michael.

Scott
1980 450 SEL

1980450sel

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Re: What's the name of this thing?
« Reply #11 on: 17 December 2009, 10:18 PM »
Well I removed the check valve.

My particular car does not have an air pump and is naturally aspirated. sort of a venturi effect to draw fresh air in to mix with the exhaust. So instead of having one molecule of carbon attached to one molecule of oxygen (carbon monoxide), the extra air supplies more oxygen so that you get carbon dioxide. I had this explained to me by an Automotive Service Technician Instructor at the college where I work (I'm also an Instructor, Electrical, if anyone cares). Anyway I was feeling sort of guilty removing emission control stuff but I'm really having difficulty understanding how injecting air to change CO to CO2 can reduce the actual amount of pollution. If I got better mileage I could understand. I guess it's just two different types of pollution. Carbon Monoxide tends to stay close to surface, people see it, smell it and that's bad, but if we attach two oxygen molecules to the one carbon molecule they will magically pull it up past the clouds and we will never have to worry about it again. I guess hindsight really is 20/20. That's my little rant for today.

Scott

P.S. BTW I'm plugging off the air injection if you hadn't guessed that by now.
1980 450 SEL

Big_Richard

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Re: What's the name of this thing?
« Reply #12 on: 18 December 2009, 12:32 PM »
the idea behind the air pump at least, is that its an exhaust gas after burner, and that's even what its called.

The additional air injected at the exhaust ports ensures that any unburned hydrocarbons do end up burnt somewhere along there route out the tail pipe. Unburned hydrocarbons are very, very bad to human health and the environment.

On catalytic converter equipped cars, its essential for this pump to be working, along with lambda control or the cats will not operate correctly and or clog.

the system fitted to your car attempts to do the same sort of thing, but without a pump, the act of the exhaust gas passing over the air injection ports sucks in fresh air so that the afterburning effect can still take place.

as far as driveability is concerned, there will be no noticeable difference, even on air pump cars they require very little energy to operate when working correctly.
« Last Edit: 18 December 2009, 12:36 PM by Patrick Bateman »