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Restoration of 6.9 #496

Started by McNuggets, 16 August 2020, 06:23 PM

McNuggets

The wheel carrier can now be stripped of the parking brake anvil-thingy, dust shields, and grease seal (pic 25, 26). The grease seal in particular needed a bit of persuasion. I found that using a punch from outside, at an angle toward the axis, helps to lift the sheetmetal seal housing from the wheel carrier (pic 27).

Both wheel carrier and hub will each have one inner bearing race still pressed onto them, against an abutment on the shaft. This made it impossible to get my puller in behind them. Placing the puller jaws on the bearing rollers chipped bits off of the race and then destroyed the cage. Taking a tip from a forum member, I bought a chisel and used it to drive the bearing race away from the abutment until enough room was made for the puller to do its job (pics 28, 29, 30). This was all installed so tightly the lettering on the bearing race was transferred in mirror image onto the spindle. Repeat for a total of four times.

Stripping the rear trailing arms was next. The outer bearing races for the wheel carrier spindle were removed with the divining rod, pretty easy. The trailing arm to subframe bushings came out without much trouble thanks to the puller (pic 31). The shackle which connects the trailing arm to the caliper carrier was much more troublesome. First I tried using the puller to press the shaft out of the shackle (pic 32), which is NOT THE RIGHT WAY to go about it! The shackle, as I later discovered, is S shaped and the shafts are bonded to it with rubber. The right thing is to press the shafts out of the mating component.

McNuggets

Next, I reversed the puller and tried to press the shaft out of the trailing arm. I succeeded only in chipping the trailing arm (pic 33). I got fed up and sawed the shackle off so I could fit the trailing arm into my small benchtop press (pic 34). This worked for one side. On the other, no amount of pressing or heating seemed to do anything. I tried dissolving the steel shaft in alum for a few days but gave up after nothing much happened. Finally I cut eight slits into the shaft, leaving only a paper thin sliver of steel. This weakened the press fit enough for me to get the shaft out (pic 35). That's more or less the whole suspension stripped (pic 36), whew!

I had my heart set on re-plating all fasteners and wanted to get as many parts into this "single" batch as I could, including from the engine. I also needed to start preparing to box everything up and it seemed like a good idea at the time to just plow through and take it all to pieces. A few months earlier I had finished removing the intake manifold, despite the two broken bolts still stuck in the heads. I now separated the plenum and runners from each other, and found to my delight that the rubber collars which connect the eight ports were still supple (pic 37). They are about $70 each last I checked since the diameter is different from the M116/7. I also disassembled the throttle linkage, here is a rough layout for reassembly showing the one set of left-hand threads (pic 38). I think I will reuse the plastic bearings, they seemed fine with no noticeable play.

I have a good deal more photos of removing the differential, transmission, harmonic balancer, brake calipers. etc etc etc but no real structure to post them in so I think I will leave it here for now and post those as I complete their respective refurbishment. I was able to get the car onto a wooden frame and towed to the new place, which I have begun preparing for work. I'll make another post about that and some of the refinihsed parts and hardware soon! Thank you all as always for being the friendly and helpful fountain of w116 knowledge that you are.

Nuggies

rumb

Indeed rebuilding the rear axle assemblies is probably the most difficult job I have ever done on my 6.9. It likewise required a whole lot of new tools.  I made the tool for removing and also pressing in the large bearing.

The front brake wear sensor cable is bonded to the tube. I managed to repair the wires and sheath but it was still difficult to get the cable back thru the tube. Still beats what $ ppl want for these if you can find them.

I am supporting the back of the car and stands with a length of 2x4's that goes across the rear of the floor pan.  Seems to hold well, and this way I removed the entire rear subframe complete with everything, and will be able to put back the same.
'68 250S
'77 6.9 Euro
'91 300SE,
'98 SL500
'14 CLS550,
'16 AMG GTS

raueda1

I truly stand in awe of you guys doing this rear end work. :o  All hail the axle men!!

Quote from: rumb on 28 December 2022, 11:04 AMThe front brake wear sensor cable is bonded to the tube. I managed to repair the wires and sheath but it was still difficult to get the cable back thru the tube. Still beats what $ ppl want for these if you can find them.

I did the same.  It was amazingly difficult because of heat and all the road crap that finds it's way into the tube. Silly design. But it sure looks better after replating.  And it even works! :D
-Dave
Now:  1976 6.9 Euro, 2015 GL550
Before that:  1966 230S, 1964 220SE coupe, 1977 Carrera 3.0

rumb

Check out my car's posts about the large caliper bracket. Hope you didnt bung yours up, they are almost $300 each new.

https://forum.w116.org/test-drive/my-6-9-s/191/

 posts 196-198.  You will see the crude but effective alignment tools I made so you can press them back in at the same angle. they came out.  One tool for each side.

If you want to borrow them, let me know. Also in post 191 you can see the 2 large round tools I made that remove and install the large bearing.
'68 250S
'77 6.9 Euro
'91 300SE,
'98 SL500
'14 CLS550,
'16 AMG GTS

daantjie

Daniel
1977 450 SEL 6.9 - Astralsilber

McNuggets

Haven't touched it all year. I aim to resume work in January.

andrewk

Quote from: McNuggets on 24 November 2023, 01:44 PMHaven't touched it all year. I aim to resume work in January.

Keen to see how you go with everything, especially the front subframe if you get into the bushings and bearings there.

NB: I replaced the ring "connector" seals (100-140-04-65) and they were 46.50 USD each from Classic Center Mine were definitely too stiff to reuse without headaches.

Good luck

1979 450 SEL 6.9 (#5532) - silbergr√ľn metallic