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Removal of In-Tank Fuel Strainer Tips

Started by nblewi0, 29 May 2023, 01:00 AM

nblewi0

Hi All,
I'm stuck and I need some assistance.  I am trying to remove the in-tank fuel strainer from my 1973 450 SE.  I have the special ground socket from MercedesSource and I have removed the hose from the strainer to the fuel damper.  I can't get the strainer to budge!  I have sprayed penetrating oil on it and still no luck.  Am I just gonna have to remove the tank and try that way?  Have any of you had trouble with it and have any tips?  It seems like it just comes out for most of the posts that I have seen on the forums.

Thanks,
Nat
1973 Mercedes 450 SE "Goldie"
1973 Mercedes 450 SE "Blueberry"

daantjie

Usually I would say to heat the area with a torch but obviously you don't want to do that around a gas tank :o

Sometimes tightening the nut slightly and then trying to loosen does the trick.


Likely you have a leverage issue as the space is tight.  Maybe using a long extension to bring the point of rotation further towards you will allow you to use a longer wrench or breaker bar?

Daniel
1977 450 SEL 6.9 - Astralsilber

Jan S

I know what you are going through ... had the same problem a few years ago. Tight space, difficult to find leverage.

I had to use a small scissor jack to put sufficient force on the nut. It worked for me.
1975-mod W116 450 SE with 6.9 engine

daantjie

#3
A tip for the install of the new strainer and o ring.  I used a very thin smear of silicone dialectric grease on the o ring and threads.  You will see the threads are very fine and appear to be aluminium.  Clean the threads on the tank side as well.  Likely it will be very rusty if it is as stuck as you say.  It is very easy to cross thread so make sure you get a good seat and tighten by hand first.
Daniel
1977 450 SEL 6.9 - Astralsilber

nblewi0

Thanks for the tips!  I have some time today so I will try it again and report back.

Nat
1973 Mercedes 450 SE "Goldie"
1973 Mercedes 450 SE "Blueberry"

nblewi0

I got it!  Thanks to Daniel and Jan.  Here is the set-up that eventually got it out for me:

Long ratchet, socket extension, wobble extension, 17 mm socket, and special removal tool.  I was able to get enough pressure on the nut and use the long lever to get it off.  It was kinda funky geometry in the end because the ratchet handle ended up down by the rear passenger tire but it worked for me.  I just couldn't budge the strainer with a standard length 17 mm wrench and the special removal tool alone.  I was really struggling to hold the tool in place with one hand and get enough torque on the nut to remove it with the other using just the 17 mm wrench.  I also sprayed it for several days with penetrating oil.

I did also learn one thing to look out for when I got the old strainer off.  The old o-ring stayed in place on the tank for me.  It was hard and crusty and I removed it with a pick.

Thanks again for all the great advice on this forum.

Nat

20230529_112558.jpg
   
1973 Mercedes 450 SE "Goldie"
1973 Mercedes 450 SE "Blueberry"

daantjie

Daniel
1977 450 SEL 6.9 - Astralsilber

Feather535

You were lucky.  I could't get the strainer out until I removed the tank--but I was planning to do that anyway.

Once I had it out I discovered that hard gobs of old glue were making it hard to get a good purchase on the strainer from underneath. The strainer is surrounded by a donut-shaped rubber gasket that is glued to the bottom of the tank and the glue must have squeezed out when the gasket was installed.
--------
1977 280SE
1983 300D (sold)
1988 BMW 535is
1999 E320T (sold)
2009 E350T (wife's)

JP

#8
Dear Fellows, just wanted to share my experience with this job in case it helps anyone.

In my case the hose with the 19mm nut attached to the strainer was extremely tight, so much so that I could not turn it with a spanner (either side of it). I decided to cut the rubber a sclose as possible to the nut and use a tall 19mm socket with an extended 3/4 wrench that barely went down by the axle (slight angle actually, still able to turn the socket). The nut finally gave up and it brought along the strainer with it, which I was able to separate once on my bench.

I replaced the hose for a new one and reused the strainer which in my case was in great shape.

For reinstalling the strainer I used a 46mm socket I found on Aliexpress which is made for oil filters and costs a fraction of the widely know alternative out there (about $10 delivered, link below), a 1/2 to 3/4 adapter and the same extended wrench used earlier.

The new hose fit nicely with a crown spanner this time around.

Hope this helps anyone!! Cheers



Socket for sale

JP



Quote from: jpgcl84 on 01 June 2024, 07:49 AMDear Fellows, just wanted to share my experience with this job in case it helps anyone.

In my case the hose with the 19mm nut attached to the strainer was extremely tight, so much so that I could not turn it with a spanner (either side of it). I decided to cut the rubber a sclose as possible to the nut and use a tall 19mm socket with an extended 3/4 wrench that barely went down by the axle (slight angle actually, still able to turn the socket). The nut finally gave up and it brought along the strainer with it, which I was able to separate once on my bench.

I replaced the hose for a new one and reused the strainer which in my case was in great shape.

For reinstalling the strainer I used a 46mm socket I found on Aliexpress which is made for oil filters and costs a fraction of the widely know alternative out there (about $10 delivered, link below), a 1/2 to 3/4 adapter and the same extended wrench used earlier.

The new hose fit nicely with a crown spanner this time around.

Hope this helps anyone!! Cheers



Socket for sale