Author Topic: Modifying W123 Lock Cylinder to fit W116  (Read 749 times)

Diesel 617

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Re: Modifying W123 Lock Cylinder to fit W116
« Reply #15 on: 23 February 2019, 11:07 AM »
As I understand this is what we want to use to re lubricate our locks
https://www.mboemparts.com/oem-parts/mercedes-benz-lubricating-grease-002989065109


Is anyone using graphite powder or something similar? The my locks on the door handles love to freeze and I have to melt them with a torch. Not a good long term solution.

Going to call Monday and see if the dealers carry this on the shelf.
« Last Edit: 27 February 2019, 08:51 AM by Diesel 617 »
1980 300SD Retired
1979 280SE Euro Spec Import Crank Windows and Cloth Seats


Inventory Price
1980 450SEL/SE 722.004 Trans 150kmi ($50)
1978-1980 300SD Trans 260k mi $50
-2 450 Pairs + 300SD pair bad boots Axles $25/45
-3.07 450/300SD Differential $30

OLDGOLD

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Re: Modifying W123 Lock Cylinder to fit W116
« Reply #16 on: 23 February 2019, 06:08 PM »
I’ve used graphite powder with good results. I’ve heard that some people swear by WD40, and others say to avoid it like the plague. I would not use it as there are better options out there.

I was talking to a MB parts guy last week and he said that his cylinder started to stick and he used the grease you mentioned from MB and he has yet to have it stick since, and that was a couple years ago. I’ll be using this in my rebuilt ignition cylinder.

3l33ter

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Re: Modifying W123 Lock Cylinder to fit W116
« Reply #17 on: 25 February 2019, 02:10 AM »
Those wafers/tumblers look identical to the ones in VW and Porsche locks.

'75 280S
'77 6.9
'82 300TD

Max-NL

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Re: Modifying W123 Lock Cylinder to fit W116
« Reply #18 on: 25 February 2019, 08:48 AM »
Volkswagen and Porsche used the same manufacturer for their locks as MB (HUF).

I found this on Ebay, looks like these could be used for those with the older style keys  : https://www.ebay.com/itm//251406644634
1971 350SL
1975 280S
1975 450SEL 6.9 #140

OLDGOLD

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Re: Modifying W123 Lock Cylinder to fit W116
« Reply #19 on: 25 February 2019, 07:04 PM »
I also saw VW wafers on the same site when I was looking for the ones I purchased. Those are more likely to work for the non-sidewinder keys as the ones I bought have notches inside the holes.

OLDGOLD

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Re: Modifying W123 Lock Cylinder to fit W116
« Reply #20 on: 21 March 2019, 07:34 PM »
I think I'm done fooling with keys for a while. I was able to procure 2 extra non-sidewinder/not skinny key cylinders not including the one in the car. I also bought a JMA key blank and took them to "Bee's Keys" in Dallas. They were able to use the individual wafers from the 2 tumblers and and made one and cut a key to fit.  It's a little jagged, but I'm sure it will smooth out since I drive her everyday. I also made sure to buy Mercedes-Benz lock cylinder grease. It comes in a can with a convenient nozzle for shooting it into cylinders as well as 2 other tips.

I'm still looking for a sidewinder cylinder so I can have one key for the car as I do have the wafers for that type of tumbler, but I'll live with 2 for now as long as they look original. If someone can sell me one from a 380SL, those will work too!

OLDGOLD

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Re: Modifying W123 Lock Cylinder to fit W116
« Reply #21 on: 01 April 2019, 09:03 PM »
This will be my last post on this thread as my keys worries are behind me now! I procured a 450SL sidewinder lock cylinder, then proceeded to remove the lock wafers from my passenger door which I never use and installed them into the new-to-me cylinder. Now I have one skinny key for the entire car. The real beauty of this that if I ever lose my keys and can't find the spare, I can always order one from the dealership thus avoiding having to hire an old bearded man that lives in his van to cut one by hand. Been there, done that for $375. He was awesome though.

Honestly, if your careful and keep track of the wafers, you can swap them over with relative ease. One thing to note is that after you pry off the cap from the cylinder, there is still half a roll pin or more left in the cap that can be punched in further to seal the lock once you swap over the wafers.

When I was removing the wafers from the door handle, I had to punch out a pin from the middle of the mechanism to gain access to the cylinder. I then broke the rod that goes into the central locking mechanism, but instead of driving my self crazy trying to fix a lock I never use which is all the rod controls, I left all the wafers out of the door cylinder and the rod off. I then used a tiny cotter pin to put it back together. Even if you tried to use a screw driver to turn the lock, it would just spin and not unlock the door. I like more security, and the door still opens as normal. Plus, every time I've tried to unlock the passenger door, it requires much more effort to the point where I feel like I may break something. Not sure if everyone else has the same experience.

Also, in case anyone wanted an update, those aforementioned Chinese wafers won't work for our era of sidewinder key. The notch on the inside of the wafer is on the opposite side of the hole. Maybe they are for a 90's or early 00's sidewinder key? However, the locksmith that rebuilt my old cylinder bartered me for them. Great success!