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Just secured a 450 SEL 6.9 after bit of a chase (years)

Started by andrewk, 18 October 2022, 07:38 AM

raueda1

I'm pretty sure that the fuzzy yellow/green stuff on the fuel cap is a kind of salt formation resulting from moisture condensation on some metal surfaces.  And where there is moisture there is usually rust.  As part of your pre-start fuel system cleanup it might be a good idea to pull the gas tank and clean up the giant fuel sieve etc.  If there's a lot of crap in the tank your new fuel filter could clog up very very fast (ditto small filter on the fuel distributor).  Keep us posted, good luck and cheers,
-Dave
Now:  1976 6.9 Euro, 2015 GL550
Before that:  1966 230S, 1964 220SE coupe, 1977 Carrera 3.0

andrewk

#31
Quote from: raueda1 on 13 November 2022, 07:32 PMI'm pretty sure that the fuzzy yellow/green stuff on the fuel cap is a kind of salt formation resulting from moisture condensation on some metal surfaces.  And where there is moisture there is usually rust.  As part of your pre-start fuel system cleanup it might be a good idea to pull the gas tank and clean up the giant fuel sieve etc.  If there's a lot of crap in the tank your new fuel filter could clog up very very fast (ditto small filter on the fuel distributor).  Keep us posted, good luck and cheers,

I have a friend assisting me tomorrow to empty the fuel tank and remove it in order to get the tank acid dipped, inspected and repainted. We'll also remove the fuel delivery system for refurbishment while the tank is off, insert the blocks in the suspension and take out the battery, vacuum out the engine compartment dust.

In addition, I removed the air cleaner unit in order to inspect the oxidation under better lighting, and generally clean it up as it was fairly grubby with dust and oil, plus the disintegrated bonnet liner (factory original crumbly biscuit!)

I have used a warm water solution of Decon 90 degreasing surfactant cleaner (designed for laboratory instruments and glass, safe on mild steel) and a blue 3M non-scratch scrubby pad. The metal is coming up nicely after a bit of a clean. I'll send it off for proper stripping and painting in matte black (matched to the original) when I take the fuel tank. The seal at the bottom of the air cleaner also needs replacing as it is bent and no longer pliable, (is it Üro PN# 0010942280?)

The yellow Zinc plating on the air cleaner has come up like new using the Decon so I'm confident I can get a lot of the other parts looking nice and clean with some work in the future.

NB: Decon can be aggressive and should never be used on Aluminium (contains Potassium hydroxide).
1979 450 SEL 6.9 (#5532) - silbergrün metallic

andrewk

Yesterday a friend and I got to work on the car, getting it off the ground, checking the fuel system, rolling and re-inflating the tyres, removal of a few components for stripping and painting. Most importantly, installing the rear suspension chock blocks to enable to the car to be driven out of the garage following restart. We also cleaned the driver's side window area. Wow this car is filthy.

We had intended to remove the fuel tank, but the jacking process took much longer than expected as we couldn't get the rear right side suspension to move down enough to be able to insert the rubber block (see picture).
The fuel tank seemed to be empty or we couldn't get the siphon hose down far enough to reach fuel. I need to get some taller jack stands to be able to access the fuel system and drain safely. A job for next week...

The majority of the rubber in the suspension (and likely steering system) has perished to a crumbly, and it's going to be fairly tedious to replace it all (not to mention the difficulty in obtaining a lot of the parts which seem to have been discontinued).

I knew what I was getting myself into...
1979 450 SEL 6.9 (#5532) - silbergrün metallic

andrewk

I had an extremely tedious experience draining the fuel tank after thinking it was empty, it turns out 40 L was still in there. Whoops. After that, the fuel system was removed and given a good clean.



Last night, I managed to get the engine to turn over freely.
I left the fuel supply system out of the car so no fuel was supplied to the engine. Then, a brand new Varta battery was installed, voltages at critical points measured and all the fuses inspected for corrosion. Electronics all seem to be working and belts intact, so we decided to crank the engine. It turns over well with no hesitation or obvious resistance. It even fired almost immediately after the key was turned - probably the last little bit of fuel in the injectors.

I am extremely happy that everything is turning, and all of the fluids look to be in good condition, in line with the maintenance history.

I sent the fuel system brackets off for Nickel-Zinc plating and passivation as they were pitted and filthy, but otherwise in good condition. A replacement bracket from Niemoeller is several hundred dollars so I figure restoration will be the best bet for parts like this. The battery tray is just over $100 AUD from Niemoeller so I ordered a replacement with some other parts.

Next the rear HPF axle valve (in really bad shape, caked in mud and oil) will be removed and sent to Martin Werminghausen in the USA for refurbishment and the return hoses replaced as they have perished, one is missing! then the fuel system will be reinstalled; completely refurbished with new hoses, pump, filter, strainer, accumulator, damper, mounting buffers. Then it will be time to get this old girl running and out of the garage :D

In the interim, I have also purchased a lot of rubber seals, suspension, brake and axle parts which have deteriorated and require attention. Those are small, moderate to low priced items I can fix while waiting for parts to arrive from the USA, Germany and from the electroplating shop in Queanbeyan (Electroplating Technology for those of you in Australia). This way I avoid over capitalising on the expensive parts until I can diagnose them properly.

This forum is a very good resource for a W116 6.9 owner, and I am extremely grateful for the time put in to the content on here - it has been extremely helpful.





1979 450 SEL 6.9 (#5532) - silbergrün metallic

andrewk

The fuel system hoses were rock hard, likely original to the car and weeped fuel when flexed. A reminder to inspect your fuel system hose if it hasn't been checked recently. Carrying a fire extinguisher is probably a good idea too.

The pump and accumulator were original but the filter was replaced somewhere around 2005 (2005 date code on the can).
1979 450 SEL 6.9 (#5532) - silbergrün metallic

daantjie

Nice progress.  Absolutely a good idea to have a fire extinguisher handy when working on the fuel system and of course disconnect the battery.  As well keeping one in the cab when driving is also a no brainer.  As an old Benz buddy of mine says:"The entertainment value of an engine fire should not be dismissed out of hand"... ;D
Daniel
1977 450 SEL 6.9 - Astralsilber

Jan S

You are moving forward relatively fast, great to see and follow your project.

My car had a shot accumulator and fuel pump 1,5 yrs ago, so I decided to renew everything. Although the bracket got a good clean.

Adding a pic taken before assembly, can serve as an inspiration  :)
1975-mod W116 450 SE with 6.9 engine

daantjie

Quote from: Jan S on 07 December 2022, 05:47 PMYou are moving forward relatively fast, great to see and follow your project.

My car had a shot accumulator and fuel pump 1,5 yrs ago, so I decided to renew everything. Although the bracket got a good clean.

Adding a pic taken before assembly, can serve as an inspiration  :)

Hmm this is car porn, nice 8)
Daniel
1977 450 SEL 6.9 - Astralsilber

BCK1963

Bernd

1976 Merc 6.9  since 2013

rumb

We build these lovely fuel assemblies and the stick them under the car in the dirtiest location!
'68 250S
'77 6.9 Euro
'91 300SE,
'98 SL500
'14 CLS550,
'16 AMG GTS

Jan S

Quote from: daantjie on 09 December 2022, 01:45 PM
Quote from: Jan S on 07 December 2022, 05:47 PMYou are moving forward relatively fast, great to see and follow your project.

My car had a shot accumulator and fuel pump 1,5 yrs ago, so I decided to renew everything. Although the bracket got a good clean.

Adding a pic taken before assembly, can serve as an inspiration  :)

Hmm this is car porn, nice 8)

I hope you are all over 18  ;)
1975-mod W116 450 SE with 6.9 engine

andrewk

#41
Quote from: Jan S on 07 December 2022, 05:47 PMYou are moving forward relatively fast, great to see and follow your project.

My car had a shot accumulator and fuel pump 1,5 yrs ago, so I decided to renew everything. Although the bracket got a good clean.

Adding a pic taken before assembly, can serve as an inspiration  :)

Inspiration yes but also very useful as I did not take adequate photos to be able to reassemble the bracket, owing to significant dismantling on the car - the bolts and buffers were almost impossible to separate. Very helpful indeed. Thank you!

Here's my rear axle valve mud cake. I sent it off to Martin Werminghausen in the USA (600 Air Suspension Shop) for rebuilding / machining as I lack the capability to test high pressure hydraulics here. Martin is a big w116 6.9 fan, and very knowledgeable on these systems.


1979 450 SEL 6.9 (#5532) - silbergrün metallic

Jan S

Great to hear the pic was useful!

Adding one before the clean.
1975-mod W116 450 SE with 6.9 engine

raueda1

Quote from: Jan S on 07 December 2022, 05:47 PMYou are moving forward relatively fast, great to see and follow your project.

My car had a shot accumulator and fuel pump 1,5 yrs ago, so I decided to renew everything. Although the bracket got a good clean.

Adding a pic taken before assembly, can serve as an inspiration  :)
This beautiful picture reminds me of a question that maybe you or somebody can answer.  On your assembly the hose connecting the filter and accumulator has a foam cover.  If memory serves me (not likely  ??? ) my car doesn't have the foam which means that it didn't come with one from the parts house.  Nor does the pump => filter hose.  Do you know what the purpose is?  Vibration damping and physical protection come to mind.  So does protection against a cracked hose spraying mist - the cover could collect the leak so it just drips instead of spraying explosive mist.  A few months ago I had exactly such a spraying scenario, very scary and dangerous. Now I'm wondering if I should go back and add  covers to the hoses.  I suppose it's just neoprene foam.  Thanks and cheers,

https://forum.w116.org/index.php?action=dlattach;attach=13333;image
-Dave
Now:  1976 6.9 Euro, 2015 GL550
Before that:  1966 230S, 1964 220SE coupe, 1977 Carrera 3.0

Jan S

I somehow believed back then the purpose of the foam was to protect the high pressure fuel hose (filter to accumulator) from physical wear and tear. As you can see from the pic taken before disassembly, the hose is in physical contact with the right rear axle (lays on top). Minor relative movements between axle and hose could lead to wear and eventually a leakage.

This was my assumption back then. I didn't spend to much thinking on this.

I liked your idea/assumption that the foam shall prevent fuel spraying. But why not on the hose from pump to filter?

Maybe someone on the forum knows ....
1975-mod W116 450 SE with 6.9 engine