Garage > Mechanicals

Central locking troubleshooting and repair

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rumb:
The DIY link did not mention that the vac line is secured to the bottom of the door in the very front bottom corner and is a real B to get off.

Start at the drivers door and work your way around the car.

The exterior door handles are very easy to remove and greasing them makes them open like silk.

raueda1:
Thanks to all.  This is very helpful and fills in the blanks nicely.  Looks like I'll get started this weekend.  Cheers,

raueda1:
I realized that I have another question.  The vacuum diagram in the manual seems to show that there are several "Y's" and a check valve behind the firewall someplace under the dashboard.  Is this so?  I hate doing stuff under the footwells.  Picture of my setup under the hood is shown below. Sorry, not a great pic.  Thanks and cheers,

revilla:
Yes, there’s another check valve behind the dashboard between your steering wheel column and the A pillar.  It was smartly placed there to avoid someone opening the hood/bonnet and blowing air from the main vacuum lines that enter next to the fuse box to unlock/steal cars. I know of some people who have intentionally remove it to have a “plan B” to unlock the car if needed.
Additionally, for a complete diagnosis of the vacuum system we must check the lines and ‘Y’ rubber connectors that run from left towards the glovebox and to the right A pillar. There are a total, if I remember correctly, of 4 lines hidden there behind the center console and glovebox (red, green, yellow/green, yellow/red). The red and green control the heater valves. There’s also a diaphragm next to the hvac fan, but this one rarely fails as it isn’t exposed vertically as the elements inside the doors.
I always start with the check valves next to fuse box, then air switch in drivers’ door, then starting from the trunk lock, to the gas trap lock, then rear right door, then front right, then rear left door. The advantage of this approach is that you can test for leaks by section therefore ruling out those areas that are leak free, and working your way towards the vacuum source. 
What to look for? I have found many blocked check valves, broken diaphragms in each of the 3 doors that have them (99% culprits are the 2 top (total 4) that fail due to accumulating humidity, dust, etc that sits on top. Also broken plastic lines with very difficult to see hairline splits. Despite other accounts, I have personally never seen a failure in any of the rubber connectors, they seem quite robust, even the ones at the engine compartment due to heat.   But they are so easy to check that it worth the effort.
Last advice, always use vacuum to test as opposed to putting pressure in the lines as it might pop the diaphragms. Don’t ask me how I know that...
Good luck.

raueda1:

--- Quote from: revilla on 09 April 2021, 09:41 AM ---Yes, there’s another check valve behind the dashboard between your steering wheel column and the A pillar.  It was smartly placed there to avoid someone opening the hood/bonnet and blowing air from the main vacuum lines that enter next to the fuse box to unlock/steal cars. I know of some people who have intentionally remove it to have a “plan B” to unlock the car if needed.
>>>snip<<<
--- End quote ---
Outstanding, thanks!

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