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1
Test Drive / Re: My 6.9's
« Last post by rumb on Today at 01:45 PM »
Here is some of the hardware from the plating company.
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Test Drive / Re: My 6.9's
« Last post by rumb on Today at 01:41 PM »
Today I refinished the anti-squat components of the rear suspension.  De-grease, mask bearing surfaces with duct tape, bead blast, polish all bearing surfaces with crocus cloth, remask for painting, and paint. Note the tooling I had made to get this assembly apart. Mine were very stubborn to get apart.
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Mechanicals / Re: 1974 350SE Power steering high pressure hose
« Last post by raueda1 on Today at 09:59 AM »
The original hose has a rubber sheathing protecting it, and it also has a restrictor built in closer to the pump end (6.9). I’m not sure on the spec but it would be DIN or Metric, not SAE.

Tim
It would be great for all of us to know exactly what the high pressure PS hose spec was.  Finding the right hose for DIY replacement can be a challenge.  My hose was replaced at some point and it's not at all clear that it was the right hose.  I actually suspect it wasn't.  Fortunately the same fittings are in fine shape.  There's no apparent restriction though. :-\

Anyway, in general DIN/ISO specs have an SAE counterpart and vice versa, so that's not an issue for us.  The burning question is, what did MB spec in the 70's?  Nobody seems to know.  I've tried to search but no luck.  What we do know is that now the temperature spec for "high temperature power steering hose" is 150°C/300°F (SAE J2050).  The corresponding euro ISO spec seems to be ISO 11425:2018 Type 5, though max temp rating is only 135°C.  SAE J2050 dates back to 1991 which was after the great under-the-hood temperature rise seen during the 80s. 

My guess is that contemporary power steering hose is overspec'd for temperature for our old cars.  If so then the task of finding a replacement is much easier.  Bulk, high pressure power steering hose (SAE J2050 or ISO 11425) isn't easy to find at a retail level.  However, 100°C bulk hose is readily available (used for construction equipment etc), and for much higher pressures than the automotive stuff.

So, I'm going to quit guessing and get some hard data.  When my car is back on the road I'm going to measure temperatures under the hood and on the PS components.  If the fittings on the high pressure side don't go over 100°C then our lives become easier.  Stay tuned.
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Interiors & Exteriors / Re: Fuel Door Bumpers
« Last post by jtwoods4 on Today at 06:30 AM »
There are 3 fuel door rubber bumpers.

The top two attach to the body (MB part number 000-987-90-40) at the 10 and 2 o'clock positions in the photo.
The lower one clips into the middle of the fuel door hinge (MB part number 116-987-06-39) at the 6 o'clock position in the photo.

The upper bumpers get mashed and are an inexpensive dealership item, $0.74-$1.00.
The lower bumper is a bit pricier dealership item, $19.07 -$26.00.

Awesome! Thank you guys!
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Mechanicals / Re: 1974 350SE Power steering high pressure hose
« Last post by TJ 450 on Today at 02:10 AM »
The original hose has a rubber sheathing protecting it, and it also has a restrictor built in closer to the pump end (6.9). I’m not sure on the spec but it would be DIN or Metric, not SAE.

Tim
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Interiors & Exteriors / Re: Fuel Door Bumpers
« Last post by daantjie on Yesterday at 10:06 PM »
While you're at it, replace the plastic grommet for the fuel door lock.  This is probably one of the least replaced parts on the 116 ;)
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Interiors & Exteriors / Re: Fuel Door Bumpers
« Last post by Alec300SD on Yesterday at 09:09 PM »
There are 3 fuel door rubber bumpers.

The top two attach to the body (MB part number 000-987-90-40) at the 10 and 2 o'clock positions in the photo.
The lower one clips into the middle of the fuel door hinge (MB part number 116-987-06-39) at the 6 o'clock position in the photo.

The upper bumpers get mashed and are an inexpensive dealership item, $0.74-$1.00.
The lower bumper is a bit pricier dealership item, $19.07 -$26.00.

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Interiors & Exteriors / Fuel Door Bumpers
« Last post by jtwoods4 on Yesterday at 06:53 PM »
Hey guys I've got a 1980 300sd and the little rubber bumpers that keep the fuel filler door from slamming have deteriorated. Does anyone know where I can get these?
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Mechanicals / Re: 1974 350SE Power steering high pressure hose
« Last post by raueda1 on Yesterday at 05:30 PM »
Hi,

Hope this isn't a thread hijack, topic is the same - power steering hose.  I'm just now doing the same job as the OP on my 6.9.  Fortunately the fittings were OK and could be reused.  I was able to locally find what I thought was a suitable substitute, Gates SAE 100R16 (ISO 11237).  This is a high pressure hydraulic hose with 2 steel reinforcement braids and rated at 8000psi.  The OE hose only seems to have one braid and power steering hoses seem to be typically rated at 1500psi so I'm wildly over spec.  So far, so good.

[Sidebar comment:  The old hose was a replacement that somebody did at some point.  Unfortunately the old hose wasn't well marked so I don't know what is was except for being  "MSHA 2G11C."  That's just a flame retardancy rating for mining applications so it doesn't help much.]

Here's my concern. This new hose is only rated for 100°C. Modern power steering hoses seem to generally be rated for 150°C.  Obviously the 6.9 engine is large, hot, and the exhaust manifold is pretty close to the hose.  Nevertheless, under-the-hood temperatures have increased a lot since the mid-70's and higher temperature materials are now far more widely available.  Anybody know what the temperature or ISO spec was on the 6.9 hose (or any of these older power steering hoses)?  This would be super helpful in helping others find suitable hose.  Thanks,

[EDIT:  Correction.  I noticed that the hose itself does NOT come particularly close to the exhaust manifold.  The section of the assembly that gets close is steel tubing.  I surmise that the MB engineers recognized that no rubber construction would survive that much heat.]
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Mechanicals / 1980 300SD w116 Steering Box Adjustment
« Last post by jtwoods4 on Yesterday at 02:44 PM »
Over the last year I have noticed a lot of slop in my steering wheel. I mean a ridiculous amount. I replaced the steering shaft coupler and it improved a lot. However, there was still some slop in the steering so I adjusted the steering box. I loosend the lock nut and unscrewed the allen screw about 2 to 3 turns. I went to an empty parking lot and did a lot of left and right right circles to make sure the steering box was not binding. Everything is fine. WOW! What a difference! My steering is tight and responsive again!

However, after the adjustment the car now pulls to the right? I will need to get an alignment. Question: Why would adjusting the steering box cause the alignment to change? Is this a stupid question?

-John
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